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Jaguar X-TYPE Press Pack Text February 2001
CONTENTS

1.  	OVERVIEW
(1)	NEW JAGUAR X-TYPE COMPACT SPORTS SALOON:  
PERFORMANCE, AGILITY, INNOVATION, 
CRAFTSMANSHIP AND LUXURY  
(2)	KEY TECHNOLOGIES
(3)	THE NEW JAGUAR X-TYPE AT A GLANCE
	

2.  	PRODUCT DESIGN AND ENGINEERING
(1)	EXTERIOR DESIGN AND BODY ENGINEERING
(2)	INTERIOR DESIGN AND ENGINEERING
(3)	POWERTRAIN
(4)	VEHICLE DYNAMICS
(5)	SECURITY
(6)	SAFETY
(7)	ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
(8)	ACCESSORIES
(9)	ENGINEERING AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 
PROCESSES
		
		
3.  	MANUFACTURING
(1)	OVERVIEW
(2)	PLANT REFURBISHMENT
(3)	QUALITY-FOCUSED CULTURE
(4)	INCREASED ROLE FOR SUPPLIERS
(5)	MORE EFFICIENT OUTBOUND LOGISTICS
(6)	PLANT HISTORY


4.  	MARKETING


5.	TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION
STANDARD AND OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT


1.  OVERVIEW



PRESS INFORMATION
FOR RELEASE:  Embargoed until 00.01 hrs GMT, 7 February, 2001


NEW JAGUAR X-TYPE COMPACT SPORTS SALOON:  
PERFORMANCE, AGILITY, INNOVATION, 
CRAFTSMANSHIP AND LUXURY

Jaguar's new, all-wheel drive compact sports saloon, the X-TYPE, combines a fresh 
performance spirit, handling agility and innovative technology with the luxury, 
craftsmanship and refinement for which Jaguar is renowned.  The result is a smaller 
and more affordable model, which transforms the Jaguar range and is expected to 
attract a new generation of customers to the marque when it goes on sale in June 
2001.  As Jaguar's first entrant into the fast-growing compact saloon segment, the X-
TYPE is pitched directly against such established competitors as the Audi A4, BMW 3-
Series and the Mercedes-Benz C-Class.  
Equipped with Jaguar's Traction 4 all-wheel drive system as standard, the X-TYPE is 
engineered to deliver agile and responsive handling, together with a truly refined ride.  
The X-TYPE's performance credentials are reflected in its stylish and powerful-looking 
exterior design.  Inside, traditional craftsmanship is complemented by technological 
innovation, such as the optional touch-screen multimedia system, while the car's 
practical strengths include generous space for occupants and luggage, as well as 
comprehensive safety and security equipment. 
"The X-TYPE connects Jaguar with a different type of customer," said Jonathan 
Browning, the company's Managing Director.  "It challenges existing perceptions of 
Jaguar, broadening the appeal and the accessibility of the marque, and it drives 
forward our ambitious growth strategy which began with the launch of the S-TYPE in 
1998.  Today, Jaguar is selling more cars in more markets than ever before, and X-
TYPE is targeted with helping us double sales once again."
To share details of the X-TYPE with prospective customers around the world, Jaguar 
has created a dedicated internet site for the car, at: WWW.X-TYPE.COM.  
Photographs and video footage of the car are already available, and fresh information 
and features are regularly being added as the X-TYPE's launch approaches.

At launch, three X-TYPE models are available:  the entry level 2.5 V6, the luxuriously 
equipped, range-topping 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'Special Equipment' ('S.E.'), and the 2.5 and 
3.0 V6 Sport, featuring up-rated suspension and unique exterior and interior design 
cues.  Each model has a five-speed manual transmission as standard, with a fully 
electronic, five-speed automatic transmission  optional across the range.
Agile handling and refined ride

"The X-TYPE's nimble driving dynamics reward the enthusiast, as well as reassuring 
the everyday driver," says Mike Cross, Chief Engineer. Vehicle Integrity.  "The car's 
outstanding combination of agility and refinement stems from a blend of advanced 
engineering and intuitive know-how, with each individual component having an 
influence on the ride and handling.  So to achieve the perfect balance we carried out a 
great deal of testing and fine-tuning.  You could say it's a little bit like making a fine 
wine – part science, part art."  
X-TYPE's features Jaguar's 'Traction 4' full time all-wheel drive system provides 
positive and sure-footed road holding in all conditions, with 60 per cent of torque 
directed to the rear wheels, reinforcing the sporting character of the new Jaguar 
saloon. .  A viscous coupling senses differences in speed between the front and rear 
wheels.  If wheel slip is detected, torque is transferred via the viscous coupling to the 
front or rear wheels, providing optimum traction and stability.
Agile handling and superior ride are further enhanced by the X-TYPE's ultra-stiff 
body.  The body structure's class-leading torsional stiffness – approximately 30 per 
cent higher than the previous class leader – delivers major benefits in terms of 
strength, durability, robustness and refinement.  
The body provides an exceptionally rigid basis for the precisely tuned suspension, 
including the new, fully independent torsion control link system at the rear, which 
confers a high degree of inherent stability.  Even tauter and more responsive handling 
is available on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 Sport, with its unique spring, damper and anti-roll 
bar settings.  
The car's advanced, four-channel anti-lock braking system includes electronic brake-
force distribution (EBD) for improved control and stability in adverse conditions, while 
optional Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) enhances vehicle stability and control still 
further.  
Choice of V6 engines
The X-TYPE's 24-valve, four-cam 2.5 litre and 3.0 litre AJ-V6 engines are derived from 
the S-TYPE's proven AJ-V6 powertrain.  With advanced features such as continuously 
variable cam phasing and a state-of-the-art, 32-bit engine management system, both 
engines deliver spirited, effortless performance, competitive fuel economy and low 
emissions.
The 194 bhp (145 kW) 2.5 litre and 231 bhp (172 kW) 3.0 litre engines are highly 
efficient, delivering best-in-class specific power outputs.  The engines also deliver 
excellent mid-range torque for effortless power delivery.  On both 2.5 and 3.0 litre 
engines, over 90 per cent of peak torque is available between 2500 and 6000 rev/min.  

The standard five-speed manual transmission is optimised to enhance the car's 
performance feel, while the electronic five-speed automatic option is switchable 
between 'normal' and 'sport' driving modes.  Cruise control is optional on all models.


Sculpted, purposeful exterior
The X-TYPE's stylish, contemporary design reflects the car's performance spirit, while 
sensuously sculpted forms combine with crisp detailing to give the car a sporty, 
purposeful stance and a strong Jaguar identity.  
The styling incorporates design cues from the XJ Series, XK Series and S-TYPE, while 
firmly establishing a cohesive and individual identity of its own.  Telling details 
include the characteristically sleek grille, elliptical, reflector technology headlamps – 
with high-performance xenon gas discharge option – and twin tail pipes.  Alloy 
wheels are standard across the range, including 17-inch wheels on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 
Sport derivatives.
Spacious, stylish interior
Like the exterior, the X-TYPE's cabin represents a contemporary expression of Jaguar 
values, blending quality and craftsmanship with leading-edge technology and the 
latest innovations in safety engineering.
Bird's-eye maple wood veneers and soft, luxurious trim materials convey a feeling of 
sporting luxury.  Leather trim is standard on the top-of-the-range 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' 
models.   Across the range, attention to detail is reflected in the harmonious feel of 
controls and switches, as well as the overall quality of fit and finish.  
There are two distinct interior trim themes, with the V6 Sport clearly distinguished by 
its grey-stained wood veneer, as well as part-leather sports seats and sports steering 
wheel with perforated leather trim.
Interior refinement further benefits from a comprehensive programme to minimise 
noise intrusion, aided by the car's inherently stiff body structure, and the slim pillars 
and commanding driving position give an excellent view of the road ahead.

Leading-edge multimedia system
The X-TYPE strengthens Jaguar's growing reputation at the forefront of in-car 
telematics and communications technologies.  State-of-the-art systems available on the 
X-TYPE include a notable 'industry first' for cars in this class – a 7-inch (178 mm) 
widescreen LCD touch-screen display, employing thin film transistor technology 
(TFT), providing finger-tip control of climate, audio and navigation systems, and 
(where fitted) television tuner and telephone.  This exceptionally high level of 
integration is facilitated by fibre optics to provide fast, high-quality data transfer.
Another innovation is the optional JaguarNet, one of the first systems of its kind in the 
world.  Integrating cellular telephone and satellite vehicle location technology, 
JaguarNet provides both emergency roadside assistance and access to local 
information.  The emergency assistance feature allows rapid access to police, fire and 
ambulance services.  An emergency assistance call is transmitted automatically in the 
event of airbag deployment – a potentially life-saving feature if the occupants are 
incapacitated and where rapid emergency response is of the essence.

Voice activation, a world-first for Jaguar when launched on S-TYPE in 1999, can also 
be specified, to provide voice control of primary functions of the audio, telephone and 
climate control systems, as well as – for the first time - the satellite navigation system 
and TV tuner, where fitted.  Maintaining Jaguar's leadership in this field, voice 
activation is available in German, Italian as well as English, including North American 
and Australian dialects.

Roomy, practical, versatile
In addition to its roomy, ergonomically designed cabin, the X-TYPE boasts the largest 
boot ever on a Jaguar, with a capacity of 452 litres.  Luggage capacity can be 
increased even further by folding down the rear seat's optional 70/30 split backrest.

The cabin interior also provides an array of useful stowage facilities.  For example, the 
doors have a handy tray up near the door handle, as well as a large main pocket.  To 
tailor the car's carrying capabilities to specific needs, customers can choose from a 
wide range of exterior and interior stowage accessories.  This strong emphasis on 
practicality and flexibility reflects the fact that the X-TYPE is designed to suit the 
lifestyles of a wide variety of customers.  
Standard features across the range include air conditioning, 'anti-trap' electric 
windows, a 120 Watt audio system and electric height adjust on the driver's seat.  The 
extensive options list includes automatic headlamp activation, rain-sensing wipers, 
DVD-based satellite navigation, electrochromatic rear-view mirror, ultrasonic 
reversing aid, touch-screen multimedia system, dual-band, fixed GSM phone and fully 
automatic climate control (standard on 'S.E.' models).
Safe and secure
The X-TYPE's comprehensive safety package comprises a host of sophisticated 
systems, fitted as standard on all models.  These include driver and front passenger 
occupancy sensing systems, twin dual-stage frontal airbags, side airbags for driver and 
front passenger, side curtain airbags for front and rear occupants, load-limiting and 
pre-tensioning front seat belts, three-point seat belts throughout and a collapsible 
brake pedal mechanism.
X-TYPE combines advanced safety technology with excellent structural integrity, to 
minimise occupant injury.  As a result, X-TYPE is expected to achieve a 4-star rating in 
both the European and North American NCAP tests.
Continuing Jaguar's long-standing commitment to state-of-the-art security and locking 
systems, the X-TYPE is comprehensively equipped to provide reassuring and effective 
protection against theft.  All security systems, including vehicle perimeter alarm and 
intrusion sensing, are integrated with the vehicle electronics and engine management 
systems, making the car extremely difficult to penetrate or steal, even for the most 
determined thief.
Customer-driven development
Designed and developed in record time by a 300-strong core team based at the Jaguar 
Engineering Centre at Whitley, Coventry, the X-TYPE was developed with a 
consistent focus on customer requirements.  Feedback from a massive global consumer 
research programme - Jaguar's most intensive ever - ensured that the X-TYPE's 
designers, engineers and marketers remained in tune with the needs and expectations 
of potential customers at every stage of the car's development.  
Robust quality and accelerated timescale were the results of new development 
processes integrating computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing, which 
enabled the entire development team, including suppliers, to communicate more 
efficiently and effectively than ever before.  At the same time, Jaguar used a range of 
leading-edge quality systems and processes during the X-TYPE's development 
programme.  The result is a car which delivers world-class levels of quality and 
durability, as well as having the shortest development time in Jaguar's history.
While state-of-the-art technology and leading-edge processes played a vital role in the 
development of the X-TYPE, they worked hand-in-hand with the intangible, 'human' 
elements of design and craftsmanship, particularly in terms of the surfaces and 
materials that the customer will actually see and touch.  Therefore, the X-TYPE 
benefits from the high level of craftsmanship for which is Jaguar is renowned.

£300 million manufacturing investment
The X-TYPE is built at Jaguar's totally refurbished Halewood plant on Merseyside 
(England).  In one of the most ambitious plant transformations ever undertaken 
within the motor industry, £300 million has been invested in new manufacturing 
facilities, including totally new body construction and trim lines.  At the same time, 
new working practices have been implemented to create a highly efficient, quality-
focused 'lean manufacturing' environment suitable for producing Jaguar cars. 
To prepare the workforce for building a luxury model like the X-TYPE, in place of the 
high-volume Ford Escorts built there previously, Jaguar has provided over a million 
hours of workforce training, including around 700,000 hours of 'on-the-job' training – 
an average of approximately 350 hours for each employee at the plant.   
Around 3,000 jobs have been safeguarded and an additional 500 created locally, with 
the establishment of a 65-acre supplier park alongside the plant, to feed components 
and sub-assemblies to the production line on a just-in-time basis.
New customers
"We expect the X-TYPE to attract a significant number of new customers, particularly 
younger people who previously may have regarded a Jaguar as beyond their reach or 
as being unsuitable for their active lifestyles," says Marketing Director, Phil Cazaly.  
"Delivering practicality as well as performance and style, the X-TYPE presents a 
completely new proposition.  It will help us to make rapid advances in areas where  
we have traditionally been under-represented, such as with women drivers and 
amongst 'user-chooser' company car drivers."
Doubling Jaguar sales 
Following on from the launch of the S-TYPE in 1998, X-TYPE is accelerating Jaguar's 
transformation from a niche player to a major competitor.  The smaller and more 
affordable X-TYPE extends the Jaguar line-up to four models, giving the company a 
strong presence in all key segments of the global premium car market for the first time.  
As a two-model company, Jaguar sales peaked in 1998 at a then-record 50,220 cars.  
Fuelled by the success of the larger S-TYPE saloon, Jaguar today continues to break 
sales records around the globe.  In 2000, Jaguar sold over 90 ,000 cars.  When the X-
TYPE is in full production, it is expected to more than double Jaguar's total sales, 
accounting for more than 50 per cent of total Jaguar sales worldwide.  
The largest geographical market for the X-TYPE will be Europe, which is expected to 
account for over 50 per cent of world sales in 2001.  The United States will take 
around 30 per cent; and Japan around 10 per cent.
Environmental protection

Jaguar is committed to increasing the use of recycled materials within its products, 
and in line with this strategy, the X-TYPE contains more recycled materials than any 
previous Jaguar vehicle.  Being over 90 per cent recyclable (by weight), the X-TYPE 
meets or exceeds all legal requirements and voluntary agreements for end-of-life 
recyclability, with the aim of minimising the amount of material destined for landfill.  

The introduction of the X-TYPE will have the effect of reducing Jaguar's sales-
weighted fleet average fuel consumption by approximately 10 per cent.  This will 
represent a cumulative reduction of over 25 per cent since 1990.  The fleet average 
carbon dioxide emissions value will be reduced by a similar amount. 

The X-TYPE's production facilities and processes are also designed with environmental 
protection in mind.  New initiatives introduced by Jaguar at Halewood include cleaner 
Paint Shop facilities, a substantial reduction in waste materials, the elimination of all 
expendable component packaging, the minimisation of outbound truck movements 
and the installation of more energy-efficient heating and lighting.


KEY TECHNOLOGIES

The following technologies are standard, except where stated otherwise:

Body / Exterior functionality
?	Class-leading body stiffness for optimised ride and handling and refinement
?	'Freeform' reflector technology halogen headlamps
?	Clear lens technology and multi-faceted reflector forms in headlamps and tail 
lights
?	Xenon HID headlamps (option)
?	Telescopic headlamp power wash (standard with HID headlamps, optional with 
halogen) 
?	Automatic, dynamic headlamp levelling (standard with HID headlamps, optional 
with halogen)
?	Ultrasonic reverse park control system (option)
?	Rain-sensing windscreen windscreen wipers (option)

Multimedia systems
?	Touch-screen display system, employing state-of-the-art fibre optics (option)
?	JaguarNet telematics system, integrating cellular telephone and satellite vehicle 
location technology (option)
?	Voice activation system for audio, phone and climate control systems, plus – for 
the first time - satellite navigation and TV, where fitted.
?	Dual-band, fixed GSM phone (option)
?	DVD-based satellite navigation system (option)
?	Trip computer with message centre (standard on V6 'S.E.' models)

Powertrain
?	Lightweight 2.5 and 3.0 litre, 24-valve, four-cam V6 engines with best-in-class 
specific power
?	Continuously variable cam phasing
?	Variable geometry air intake
?	Patented precision low-volume, high-velocity cooling system
?	32-bit engine and automatic transmission management systems

Vehicle dynamics
?	'Traction 4 full-time all-wheel drive with 40/60 per cent front/rear torque split
?	Viscous coupling in centre differential
?	ZF speed-sensitive power steering and unique 2-bearing front suspension top strut 
mount – sets new standards for all-wheel drive cars
?	Torsion control link rear suspension for optimised packaging and refinement
?	Four-channel anti-lock braking system with electronic brake-force distribution 
(EBD)
?	Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) option

Security
?	Thatcham-approved perimeter alarm and immobiliser
?	Ultrasonic intrusion sensing
?	Drive-away locking
?	Panic alarm
?	Global closing of all electric windows and (if fitted) sunroof
?	Inclination/tilt sensing (option)
?	'Tracker' vehicle tracing system (optional accessory)

Safety
?	Occupant sensing systems – driver's seat track position sensor, front passenger seat 
weight sensor
?	Dual-stage frontal airbags for driver and front passenger
?	Side airbags for driver and front passenger
?	Side curtain airbags for front and rear occupants
?	Collapsible brake pedal mechanism
?	Deformable plastic fuel tank


THE NEW JAGUAR X-TYPE  AT  A  GLANCE

Model line-up
?	2.5 V6
?	2.5/3.0 V6 Sport
?	2.5/3.0 V6 'S.E.'  

Exterior design

?	The car's low, aggressive stance is accentuated at the front by its sleek grille and 
the arrangement of its elliptical quad headlamps.

?	6.5 x 16 inch alloy wheels are standard on the 2.5 V6 and the 2.5 and 3.0  'S.E.' 
models.

?	The V6 Sport's exterior is distinguished by 7 x 17-inch alloy wheels, rear spoiler, 
black window surrounds and colour-keyed bumper blades, boot lid finisher and 
grille.  

Exterior functionality

?	Standard-fitment halogen headlamps and front foglamps use state-of-the-art 
'freeform' reflector technology, computer-designed for optimum performance.  

?	Clear lens technology and multi-faceted reflector forms in the headlamps and tail 
lights give a distinctive, high-tech appearance.

?	Optional xenon HID headlamps, producing more than twice the light of a halogen 
system, are available for the first time on a Jaguar.

?	An optional ultrasonic reverse park control system can be specified.

?	Rain-sensing windscreen wipers can be specified for convenient and safe, hands-
free operation. 

Interior design

?	The X-TYPE is the first Jaguar to be fitted with a one-piece facia and centre 
console, enhancing the cabin's overall feel of solidity and integrity.

?	The high level of craftsmanship for which Jaguar is renowned extends to the fit, 
finish and feel of individual components such as 'soft-touch' controls and switches.

?	The V6 Sport is distinguished by its grey-stained bird's-eye maple trim, contoured 
part-leather sports seats and sports steering wheel with perforated leather trim.

Multimedia systems 

?	A state-of-the-art, 7-inch (178 mm) touch-screen display system is available, 
providing touch control of climate, audio and navigation systems and (where 
fitted) television tuner and telephone.  This highly integrated system is the first of 
its kind in the premium compact sports saloon sector and the first to be offered by 
Jaguar.

?	The widescreen, thin film transistor technology LCD touch-screen is supplemented 
by a separate LCD display, showing the time, ambient temperature and climate 
control temperature settings.

?	The foundation of the integrated multimedia system is an optical data network – a 
wide-band 'ring' of optical fibres, providing the fastest and highest quality data 
transfer possible.

?	An optional multi-function satellite navigation system features DVD technology, 
enabling approximately eight times the amount of information to be stored on one 
disc compared to conventional CD-ROM based systems and delivering highly 
accurate information, virtually instantaneously.

?	The navigation system features 'voice guidance', selectable in nine languages, and, 
where optional voice activation is fitted, voice-activated 'name tags' in three 
languages.  Navigation mapping coverage will extend to 17 major markets when 
the X-TYPE is launched.

?	Optional voice activation provides voice control of primary audio, telephone and 
climate control functions, as well as – for the first time – the satellite navigation 
system and TV tuner (where these systems are fitted).  Voice activation is now 
available not only for UK and US English but also German, Italian and English 
spoken with an Australian accent.

?	A Motorola dual-band, fixed GSM phone offers the user a choice of networks and 
provides optimum phone performance and call quality. With 8 Watts of power, 
the phone has a far stronger signal than a 2 Watt portable system.

?	The TV tuner – a first for Jaguar – includes stereo TV audio, widescreen picture 
options and teletext services.

?	JaguarNet, one of the first systems of its kind in the world, integrates cellular 
telephone and satellite vehicle location technology to provide emergency assistance 
and access to local information.

?	The emergency assistance feature provides rapid access to police, fire and 
ambulance services, and an emergency call is transmitted automatically in the 
event of airbag deployment.

?	The 120 Watt Alpine Standard audio system incorporates AM/FM RDS radio, 
cassette tape player and four door-mounted speakers, with the radio antenna 
integrated into the rear window.

?	The optional 180 Watt Premium audio system also incorporates a 6-disc CD 
autochanger located in the boot, and ten speakers.

?	A 6-disc CD autochanger is available as an option with the Standard system.

?	The trip computer with message centre, a standard feature on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 
'S.E', displays detailed journey data as well as information on the functioning of a 
wide range of vehicle systems, including security and engine diagnostics.

Climate control

?	Manual air conditioning with pollen filter is standard on the 2.5 V6 and the 2.5 
and 3.0 V6 Sport, while fully automatic climate control, with LCD temperature 
display and combined pollen and odour filter, comes as standard on the 2.5 and 
3.0 V6 'S.E.' models.    

Seating

?	All-new seat designs combine comfort, style, functionality and safety.

?	Leather seat trim is standard on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' models and optional on 
the 2.5  V6, while on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 Sport there is the choice of either standard 
cloth-and-leather sports seats or optional full leather sports seats.

?	The driver's seat is electrically height-adjustable on all models.

?	Eight-way power adjustment of both front seats is standard on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 
'S.E.' models. 

?	Both front seats and all three rear seating positions have manually height-
adjustable head restraints.

?	A sliding front centre armrest is standard fitment on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' 
models.

?	Heated front seats can be specified as an option.

?	The rear bench seat is available with an optional 70/30 split folding backrest.



Space and stowage

?	The X-TYPE boasts a boot capacity of 452 litres – the biggest boot ever on a Jaguar.

?	Storage capacity can be increased by folding down the rear seat's optional 70/30 
split backrest.

?	The spacious interior provides a number of useful stowage facilities, including two 
storage areas in each front door.

Other interior features

?	Electric windows include one-touch up and down operation, and incorporate an 
anti-trap feature.

?	An electrically operated tilt/slide glass sunroof with integral, sliding sunshade and 
anti-trap feature is available as an option.

?	An optional electrochromatic interior rear view mirror automatically darkens to 
reduce glare from a following vehicle's headlamps.

?	The steering column is reach- and rake-adjustable.

Powertrain

?	Based on proven S-TYPE engine, the lightweight, 24-valve AJ-V6 units deliver 
class-leading specific power outputs.  The 2.5 litre achieves 77.8 bhp/litre (58.1 
kW/litre), the 3.0 litre  77.8 bhp/litre (58.0 kW/litre). 

?	Key features include advanced, 32-bit engine and automatic transmission 
management systems and continuously variable cam phasing, giving excellent full-
load performance, reduced emissions, enhanced idle stability and improved fuel 
economy. 

?	A three stage variable geometry intake manifold optimises volumetric efficiency, 
resulting in excellent mid-range torque.

?	On both 2.5 and 3.0 litre, over 90 per cent of peak torque is available between 2500 
and 6000 rev/min.  

?	The 2.5 litre reaches peak torque of 244 Nm at 3000 rev/min and maximum power 
output of 194 bhp (145 kW) at 6800 rev/min.  

?	The 3.0 litre delivers peak torque of 284 Nm at 3000 rev/min, and maximum 
power output of 231 bhp (172 kW) at 6800 rev/min.

Vehicle dynamics

?	Jaguar's Traction 4  full-time all-wheel drive with 60 per cent of torque directed to 
the rear wheels reinforces the sporting character of the new Jaguar saloon.

?	A viscous coupling senses differences in speed between the front and rear wheels.  
If wheel slip is detected, torque is transferred via the viscous coupling to the front 
or rear wheels.

•	Best-in-class body stiffness, approximately 30 per cent higher than the previous class 
leader, provides an outstanding basis for the X-TYPE's responsive driving dynamics.

•	The speed-sensitive power steering- and unique two-bearing front suspension top 
strut mount set new standards of performance for all-wheel drive cars.
 
•	The front suspension is a twin-tube MacPherson strut design, with a fabricated 
steel front cross-member and 'L' style lower control arm incorporating a 
'hydrabush' for added dynamic performance and isolation.

•	The suspension includes a multi-link torsion control link system at the rear  – the 
first of its kind on a Jaguar.  This multi-link system allows each wheel to react 
independently to improve handling and reduce impact harshness.


•	On the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 Sport models, suspension components such as springs and 
dampers are specially tuned for even more taut, responsive handling, as are the 
steering, wheels and tyres.

•	A four-channel anti-lock braking system with electronic brake-force distribution  
(EBD) provides improved control and stability in adverse conditions.

•	Optional Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) enhances stability by linking with anti-
lock and steering to control vehicle yaw and prevent oversteer and understeer.

•	Cruise control is optional across the range.

Security

?	The following security systems are provided as standard on all models:
o	Engine immobilisation system
o	Integrated key transmitter
o	Perimeter sensing of doors, bonnet and boot
o	Intrusion sensing via ultrasonic movement sensors
o	Integrated LED
o	Global closing of all electric windows and, if fitted, sunroof
o	Central locking
o	Double locking (deadlocking) 
o	Drive-away locking
o	Panic alarm
o	Two-stage unlocking
o	'Smart' locking
o	Security-coded audio system
o	Tamper-resistant odometer
o	Gearshift interlock system (automatic models)

?	Optional security systems: 
o	Inclination (tilt) sensing
o	JaguarNet telematics system 
o	'Tracker' vehicle tracing system

Safety

?	The X-TYPE has a comprehensive range of active and passive safety features, 
including sophisticated occupant sensing systems and adaptive, dual-stage frontal 
airbags.

?	Active safety features include:
o	Inherently stable ride and handling, with Jaguar Traction 4  all-wheel 
drive
o	Anti-lock braking system with electronic brake-force distribution (EBD)
o	Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) option

?	The following passive safety features are fitted as standard on all models:
o	Dual-stage driver and front passenger frontal airbags
o	Driver's seat track position sensor 
o	Front passenger seat weight sensor 
o	Side airbags for driver and front passenger
o	Side curtain airbags for front and rear occupants
o	Load-limiting and pre-tensioning front seat belts
o	Three three-point rear seat belts and adjustable head restraints
o	Collapsible brake pedal mechanism
o	Anti-burst door latches

?	Other passive safety features include:
o	Excellent structural integrity
o	Energy-absorbing head impact zones
o	Deformable plastic fuel tank

?	X-TYPE is expected to achieve a 4-star rating in both the European and North 
American NCAP tests.

Environmental protection

?	The X-TYPE contains more recycled material than any other Jaguar, including 
recycled aluminium for the engine block and other castings.

?	The car meets or exceeds all legal requirements and voluntary agreements for end-
of-life recyclability.  Over 90 per cent (by weight) of the car is recyclable, while 
almost 100 per cent of component packaging is durable and returnable.

?	The car meets the European Stage 4 exhaust emissions standard, as well as the 
stringent Californian Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) standard.

?	The introduction of X-TYPE will reduce Jaguar's sales-weighted fleet average fuel 
consumption by approximately 10 per cent, representing a cumulative reduction of 
over 25 per cent since 1990.

?	Production initiatives include new, cleaner Paint Shop facilities, a substantial 
reduction in waste materials, the elimination of expendable component packaging, 
reduced outbound truck movements and the installation of energy-efficient 
heating and lighting at the Halewood plant.
Engineering and product development processes

?	The X-TYPE was ready for manufacture just two years after the programme 
received Board approval.

?	State-of-the-art, computer-aided engineering technology and processes 
dramatically shortened development lead times while optimising product quality 
and enabling nimble innovation.

?	The X-TYPE development programme employed the most wide-ranging set of 
quality tools and procedures ever used by Jaguar, including Advanced Quality 
Planning and refined concepts of Robustness and Reliability.

Manufacturing

?	Following a massive £300m investment, the former Ford plant at Halewood, 
Merseyside, has been completely refurbished, along with new working practices, 
to create a highly efficient 'lean manufacturing' environment.

?	The physical renewal of plant began in Summer 2000, while the transformation of 
working practices and culture began two and a half years earlier to ensure 
improved competitiveness, productivity and quality.

?	Totally new production lines installed in Body Construction and the Trim-and-
Final area.  In the Paint Shop, 70 per cent of the equipment has been replaced.  
The Press Shop, which had supplied body panels to Jaguar since 1993, has been 
fully refurbished and state-of-the-art, computerised co-ordinate measuring 
machines installed to ensure dimensional accuracy of metal stampings.

?	Over a million hours of workforce training, including around 700,000 hours of 'on-
the-job' training – an average of approximately 350 hours for each employee at the 
plant.   

?	Halewood provides Jaguar, for the first time, with all major production facilities on 
a single site.  The addition of a new supplier park alongside – another first for 
Jaguar – improves production efficiency still further.  

?	To improve efficiency in the supply process, Jaguar works with far fewer 
component suppliers on X-TYPE than on previous vehicle programmes (just 130 
compared with around 350 for S-TYPE).

?	A new rail terminal has been built, so that 90 per cent of cars destined for export 
markets will leave the plant by rail.

Marketing

?	As Jaguar's first entrant into the fast-growing compact sports saloon segment, the 
X-TYPE is expected to attract new, younger customer groups by providing an 
exciting and affordable new entry point to the Jaguar range.

?	Following the X-TYPE's launch, it is predicted that Jaguar's total sales will double.

?	Jaguar's franchised dealer network is being developed significantly in all major 
markets, reflecting the growth in sales volume that the X-TYPE will generate.  

?	The X-TYPE gives Jaguar a strong presence in the corporate sales sector for the first 
time, in the UK and across continental Europe.

?	Feedback from Jaguar's most intensive consumer research programme ever 
ensured that Jaguar's designers, engineers and marketers remained in tune with 
the needs and expectations of potential customers at every stage of the car's 
development. 

?	Jaguar is undertaking a massive, global marketing campaign to communicate the 
features and benefits of the X-TYPE to a diverse range of audiences throughout the 
world, including a dedicated web site for the car at: WWW.X-TYPE.COM.

Cost of Ownership

?	3 year / 60,000 mile mechanical and electrical warranty (extendable up to 5 years 
/ 100,000 miles at extra cost) including RAC-backed Total Incident Management 
service
?	3 year, unlimited mileage paint surface warranty
?	6 year, unlimited mileage corrosion (perforation) warranty
?	10,000 mile (16,000km) or 12 monthly service intervals



2.  PRODUCT DESIGN AND ENGINEERING

(1)  EXTERIOR DESIGN AND BODY ENGINEERING
		
DESIGN

The performance spirit of the X-TYPE is reflected in its stylish, contemporary yet 
distinctive shape, unmistakably identifying it as a Jaguar.  

"First and foremost, we set out to create a true Jaguar," says Ian Callum, Jaguar's 
Director of Design, who was appointed to the post in August, 1999, following the 
death of his illustrious predecessor, Geoff Lawson, who originally conceived the X-
TYPE's design.  

"From whichever angle the X-TYPE is viewed, it has a strong, instantly recognisable 
Jaguar identity.  The car's sensuous exterior surfaces and taut, purposeful stance 
convey a potent combination of prestige and performance.  With its blend of classic 
design and bold, progressive dynamism, the X-TYPE presents a stylish, contemporary 
expression of Jaguar's core values."

The harmonious balance between classic style and sporty looks was achieved, in part, 
thanks to a carefully devised interplay of sensuous, sculpted forms and sharp, crisp 
detailing.  This approach is evident all around the car, from its fluted bonnet surface 
to its muscular rear haunches.

At the front, the X-TYPE has a low and aggressive stance, accentuated by large, 16-
inch or 17-inch alloy wheels and a sleek grille, taking design cues from the XJ Series 
saloon.  Elliptical quad headlamps integrate with the front of the car, emphasising its 
width, and the bonnet surface is fluted in line with the headlamps, subtly 
accentuating their shape and lending a strong continuity of form.

The side profile of the car is notable for its directional, wedge-shaped body section, 
giving the car a sportier look.  At the same time, the side glass profile provides a 
distinctive Jaguar graphic.  The profile is also dictated by the need to provide a highly 
practical, generously proportioned interior, essential to the diverse needs of customers 
in this market segment, whose cars must fulfil a multitude of different roles.  But these 
are people who require a car to have discernible style and individuality, too.  With its 
unique blend of style and practicality, X-TYPE fulfils all these needs.

At the rear, the X-TYPE's overall width gradually tapers inwards, so that when the 
car is viewed from behind, its high, powerful haunches are clearly evident, conveying 
a feline muscularity similar to that of the XK Series sports cars.

The X-TYPE's chrome-tipped twin tail pipes – another distinctive Jaguar signature – 
provide an elegant finishing touch to the rear of the car, blending in with the overall 
design and providing a subtle reminder of the car's power.  

The V6 Sport model's purposeful exterior is distinguished by high-gloss, crystalline 
black window surrounds and colour-keyed bumper blades, boot lid finisher and grille 
surround with grey vanes.  The dynamic stance of the V6 Sport model is accentuated 
by its 17-inch alloy wheels with 225/45R tyres, and colour-keyed rear spoiler.

The grille surround, boot lid finisher, bumper blades and window surrounds of the 
2.5V6 and 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' models are chrome-finished.

Exterior paint colours

To deliver the sleek, glossy and resilient finish for which Jaguar cars are renowned, the 
X-TYPE, like all other models, undergoes a four-coat paint process.  This begins with 
an initial primer coat, followed by wet-sanding to ensure a super-smooth and flat 
surface for second primer and top coats.  
X-TYPE is available in a choice of twelve solid or metallic paint colours:
Solid
British Racing Green
Phoenix Red
Westminster  (blue)
White Onyx

Metallic – (optional extra)
Adriatic Blue – unique to X-TYPE
Anthracite  (black)
Carnival  (red)
Emerald  (green)
Pacific  (blue)
Platinum  (silver)
Titanium  (grey)
Topaz  (gold)


BODY ENGINEERING

Class-leading body stiffness

The class-leading torsional stiffness of the X-TYPE's body structure delivers major 
benefits in terms of strength, durability, robustness and refinement.  The body is 
approximately 30 per cent stiffer than the previous class leader.

In particular, the X-TYPE's ultra-stiff body contributes to a smooth, stable ride, by 
providing a rigid mounting for suspension components such as springs, dampers and 
bushes.  Thanks to this, the components work to optimum efficiency, isolating the 
effects of road irregularities with little or no transfer to the body.  

By enabling the suspension components to work to maximum effect, the X-TYPE's 
body stiffness also plays a key role in minimising noise and vibration, as well as 
eradicating potential squeaks and rattles.  It also contributes to an overall feel of 
robustness in all driver interfaces, including steering, pedals and instruments.  

The X-TYPE's class-leading body stiffness was achieved through the consistent 
application of computer-aided engineering (CAE) analysis techniques, throughout the 
design process, in order to optimise joints and gauges.  Every detail was subjected to 
close scrutiny.  For example, the body incorporates a structural 'shear ring' around the 
rear seat back, which is optimised for stiffness, irrespective of whether the vehicle is 
fitted with a fixed or folding rear seat back.

In addition, using sophisticated CAE techniques, the body has been carefully designed 
to ensure that its natural modal frequencies do not align with input frequencies such 
as those from the engine, driveline and road.  This helps to eliminate resonance and is 
yet another factor in ensuring overall refinement.

Quality, strength, refinement and durability

Within the design parameters, the X-TYPE body is designed for manufacture to the 
highest standards of quality, incorporating all the associated values of strength, 
refinement and durability.

To help meet the structural targets, X-TYPE's monocoque body shell includes one-piece 
bodyside outer pressings and one-piece inner pressings for maximum dimensional 
integrity.  High-strength steel is used in critical areas such as the front longitudinals, 
seat belt anchorages, suspension mounting points, bumper mountings and door 
intrusion beams.  Finite element analysis enabled the engineers to assess the behaviour 
of materials and components under different load conditions and determine the 
precise areas where high strength-steel was required, thereby optimising the weight of 
the bodyshell.

For optimum corrosion protection, 81 per cent (by weight) of the X-TYPE's body shell 
is double-sided, zinc-coated steel.  

Body sealing for refinement and quality
 
All doors have triple seals with locating channels welded to the door inners to provide 
optimum contact of the seal to the body.  The primary seal is a single-density 
ethylene/propylene diene monomer (EPDM) sponge extrusion, attached around the 
full periphery of each door using heat-applied, industrial-strength, double-sided 
adhesive tape.  For optimum sealing effectiveness, the door seals have large corner 
radii and smooth transitions.  

Roof mounted drip rails, another potential source of wind noise, are eliminated.  Air 
leakage through body apertures is a key determinant of customer perceived 
refinement.  Jaguar engineers therefore set very stringent targets to keep air leakage to 
a minimum.  Full body undersealing and the fitment of liners to all wheel arches 
reduces the transmission of road-induced noise into the cabin.  

Within the engine bay, key joints are sealed to avoid the risk of edge bleed while all 
doors are wax injected.  

One-piece, body-coloured bumpers

The one-piece, body-coloured front and rear bumpers contribute both to style and 
protection, having an energy absorbing compression-moulded polypropylene foam 
core to resist minor parking knocks up to 5 mph (8 km/h).  The front beam is steel 
while the rear beam is an aluminium extrusion, mounted to the rear rail brackets.

The front grille is integral with the front bumper assembly enabling it to move 
backwards in a minor parking accident without damage to adjacent components.  The 
body colour front splitter vane is removable to reveal the front towing eye.  The front 
bumper also incorporates air intake and brake cooling ducts together with the 
optional headlamp power wash and fog lamps.


FUNCTIONALITY

'Freeform' reflector technology headlamps

Standard-fitment halogen headlamps and front foglamps use state-of-the-art 
'freeform' reflector technology, computer-designed for optimum performance.  

The strikingly designed, elliptical quad headlamps integrate elegantly with the 
complex surfaces of the front end and feature clear, lightweight and highly impact-
resistant polycarbonate lenses.  The reflector technology full-beam lights, as well as the 
sidelights, are contained within the two inner lamp housings, while the low-beam 
projector lights and direction indicators are integral with the outer housings.  Side 
repeater indicators are fitted in the front wing.

Both front and rear lamps incorporate unique, highly faceted reflector forms, coated 
with a high gloss, aluminium, vacuum-metallised finish to give a jewel-like 
appearance.  The distinctive style of the 'see-through' clusters creates a unique, 
instantly recognisable X-TYPE signature.  All lamps have long-life bulbs for improved 
durability, benefiting cost of ownership.

Manual headlamp levelling, fitted as standard, allows the driver to compensate for 
various loads so that the beam remains level.  There are four settings, ranging from 
driver occupancy only, to a car that is fully loaded and towing a caravan or trailer.

Xenon HID headlamps option

Xenon high-intensity discharge (HID) low-beam projector headlamps are available for 
the first time on a Jaguar.  Xenon headlamps produce more than twice the light of a 
halogen system.  Performance is further enhanced by uniform illumination across the 
beam pattern, with a colour similar to that of natural daylight.  Road markings and 
traffic signs become more highly visible and the identification of potential hazards can 
be recognised at an earlier stage, helping to make night driving safer and more 
relaxing. 

This option comes complete with telescopic headlamp power wash and automatic, 
dynamic headlamp levelling, which continuously adapts the beam level in accordance 
with driving conditions.  

Telescopic headlamp power wash

A telescopic power wash system is fitted as standard with xenon headlamps and 
available as an option with the standard halogen headlamps.  In the interests of both 
style and protection, the power wash system is concealed beneath the bumper cover.  
When power wash is activated, water pressure causes the nozzle to extend 
telescopically, through the bumper cover.

Headlamp beam conversion feature

Quick and easy headlamp conversion enables the driver to change the low beam 
pattern to suit opposite hand-of-drive when travelling abroad.  Adjustment is 
achieved by a lever, which is accessible by removing the back cover of the lamp, in the 
same way as changing a bulb.  The beam is then modified to optimise the pattern 
whilst removing the risk of dazzle.

Automatic headlamp activation option
 
Automatic headlamp activation is available as an option.  This system automatically 
turns the headlamps on and off, along with the side lights and tail lights, dependent 
on the ambient light conditions.  The system requires the optional electrochromatic 
interior mirror to be installed and is operated by a light sensor, mounted on the front 
of the interior mirror fixing cover.
 
Jewel-effect tail lights

The X-TYPE's tail lights have an attractive, 'multi-jewelled' appearance, similar to 
those of the S-TYPE and the 2001 model year XK Series.  This distinctive feature – 
which is also visible during daytime when the lights are switched off – is particularly 
noticeable in the tail lights and results from the same clear lens technology and multi-
faceted reflector forms that are used in the headlamps.
	
Power, heated door mirrors

Power, heated door mirrors are standard on all models.  The mirrors are adjusted by a 
four-way toggle switch in the driver's door switchpack.  The door mirror heater 
elements operate when the rear screen heater is switched on, rapidly clearing ice or 
condensation.

Power fold-back mirrors

Optional power fold-back mirrors allow the driver to manoeuvre more easily in tight 
spaces, by reducing the overall vehicle width.  To operate power fold-back, the driver 
simply presses a button in the driver's door switchpack.  A second press of the button 
returns the mirrors to their normal driving position.

Heated windscreen

An optional fine-wire heated windscreen provides rapid clearing of frost and ice.  In 
certain conditions, this feature also clears interior condensation from the windscreen.




High-performance windscreen wipers with rain-sensing option

The X-TYPE's twin-blade wiper system has an aerofoil on the driver's blade, 
maintaining wiper efficiency at high speeds.  There are two wipe speeds plus a 
variable intermittent wipe.  The screen wash jets are located on the bonnet.

An optional rain-sensing wiper system – first introduced by Jaguar on the S-TYPE – 
provides convenient and safe, hands-free operation.  The system automatically 
activates the wipers and optimises their frequency of operation, in response to rainfall 
detected on the windscreen.

A sensor and a control module are located on the windscreen, behind the 
electrochromatic rear view interior mirror (which must be installed for this system).  
The sensing element of the system works on the principle of refracted light by utilising 
a series of photodiodes and light-emitting diodes.  Light emitted by the diodes is 
refracted back via the windscreen to the photodiodes.  When moisture is present on 
the front windscreen, the refractive index changes and the amount of light received by 
the photodiodes is altered.  The module then calculates the frequency of wipes 
required and relays this data to the wiper system.  

Reverse park control option

An optional reverse park control system incorporates four ultrasonic sensors, 
discretely located in the rear bumper, virtually hidden from view in a black panel 
fitted to the bottom of the bumper.

When reverse gear is selected, the sensors are activated and information is sent to a 
control module, located next to the spare wheel.  When an obstacle is approximately 
1.5m (5ft) away, an intermittent signal is emitted from a speaker, located on the rear 
parcel shelf.  The intermittent 'beep' becomes gradually more frequent as the car 
approaches an obstacle until, when it is 20cm (8 inches) away, the beep becomes a 
continuous tone.

If the vehicle is used for towing, an inhibit switch will automatically turn off the 
reverse park control system when the trailer socket is connected.

























(2)  INTERIOR DESIGN AND ENGINEERING


DESIGN

A contemporary expression of Jaguar values

"For the X-TYPE's interior, the design team set out to create a contemporary 
expression of Jaguar values, with a luxurious yet distinctly sporting character to 
appeal to a younger target market.  In addition, the overall feeling of sporting luxury 
had to be complemented by the practicality of an ergonomically designed, generously 
proportioned interior with excellent stowage and luggage space," said Simon 
Butterworth, Design Project Manager.  

The X-TYPE interior blends the highest standards of quality and craftsmanship with 
the discrete application of leading-edge technology and safety engineering.  The one-
piece facia and centre console, a first for Jaguar, enhances the cabin's overall feel of 
solidity and integrity.  This is complemented by the use of natural wood veneers and 
soft luxurious trim materials.

Commanding driving position

The high waistline conveys a unique sense of Jaguar intimacy, while the slim pillars 
and commanding driving position give a light and 'airy' feel to the cabin as well as an 
excellent view of the road ahead.  This was felt by the designers to be a particularly 
important factor for female drivers, who are expected to represent a greater 
proportion of potential customers than any other Jaguar.




Sporting feel, craftsmanship and quality

The subtle, undulating curves of the facia, with contoured 'aero wing'-shaped ends, 
are complemented by the bold design and crisp detailing of the four-instrument 
cluster.  The full-sized round instrument gauges, with their distinctive 'racing green' 
dials, satin-chrome surrounds and slender pointers, reinforce the sporting feel, 
craftsmanship and quality of the X-TYPE interior.  The bright finish detailing of the 
instruments is echoed around the car, including speaker frets, door release handles, 
centre console trim and the manual gear lever.

The centre console, with its unique 'horse collar' design, houses the major controls, 
switch pack and twin LCD screens for climate control and audio systems.  The console 
also incorporates the optional, multi-function touch-screen display module.  

Two distinct interior trim themes

Two distinct interior trim themes are available on X-TYPE.  The 2.5 and 3.0 V6 Sport 
models  are clearly distinguished by  their grey-stained bird's-eye maple facia veneers, 
first seen in the limited-edition XKR Silverstone.  In addition, the V6 Sport cabin is 
equipped with contoured, part-leather sports seats and a sports steering wheel with 
perforated leather trim.

In the 2.5 V6 and the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.'  models, the facia veneers are in a lighter, 
brown bird's-eye maple.  On  V6 'S.E.' models, veneers are also applied to each door 
casing.  All veneers are finished in a clear lacquer for enhanced appearance and 
quality.

The 2.5 V6  has cloth seat trim, with leather available as an option, while on the  2.5 
and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' models, leather is standard.  The individually designed Sport seat is 
part cloth, part leather, with full leather as an option.  A wide range of trim colours is 
available, to satisfy a broad spectrum of customer tastes.


Maple veneers – a blend of craftsmanship and technology

The veneers for the doors and facia are produced using an aluminium and wood 
laminate substrate with the finest quality maple, bonded together with adhesive film.  
A pressing process subjects the components to high pressure (1000psi) and high 
temperature (140oC) in precision-cut tooling, creating a stable and dimensionally 
accurate 'technical woodset'.  The veneers are also highly resistant to colour change 
from continuous exposure to UV radiation.

All X-TYPE veneers are produced in Jaguar's recently expanded wood mill, at its 
Browns Lane plant in Coventry, alongside the veneered components for XJ Series, XK 
Series and S-TYPE.  Terry Williams, Principal Engineer at the wood mill, said, "While 
the Jaguar plants are highly automated, they're also still heavily dependent on 
manufacturing craft techniques.  We employ a mix of machinists, cabinet makers and 
French polishers."

Facia and console: technology, strength, craftsmanship

The facia assembly features a rigid, injection moulded armature covered in soft-feel 
foam and slush moulded skin.  A tubular steel crossbeam fits behind the facia, 
enhancing both refinement through increased torsional rigidity, and crash 
performance.  The beam also provides a very stable mounting for the steering column 
to minimise column vibration.  

Ergonomics

To optimise the interior ergonomics of the X-TYPE, Jaguar not only employed an array 
of sophisticated modelling tools, but also involved potential customers in the 
ergonomics development process.  As women represent an important customer group, 
the Jaguar Women's Product and Marketing Committee, comprising representatives 
from all levels of the company, also provided valuable feedback.

Early in the development process, a 'Human Factors Strategy Team' was formed, to 
ensure that the X-TYPE would satisfy a wide range of physiological considerations 
such as reach zones, clearance areas and vision lines.

 

FUNCTIONALITY

Multimedia systems
The traveller of the future will increasingly enjoy the ease and breadth of 
communications normally associated with the office or home.  With X-TYPE, the 
future is now.  Jaguar is at the forefront of the automotive communications revolution, 
and the X-TYPE is a multimedia technology showcase.


Touch-screen display

Prominent amongst the X-TYPE's sophisticated array of multimedia systems is an 
optional 7-inch (178 mm) touch-screen display.  This widescreen (16:9) thin film 
transistor technology (TFT) liquid crystal display system is the first of its kind in the 
compact sports saloon sector and the first to be offered on any Jaguar vehicle.

Featuring the highest possible level of system integration, the touch-screen display 
enables finger-tip control of climate, audio and navigation systems, and (where fitted) 
optional television tuner and telephone.  

The 'soft' buttons of the LCD touch-screen are supplemented by a small number of 
conventional 'hard' buttons around the perimeter of the screen, giving access to prime 
features.  The system also includes a supplementary, seven-segment liquid crystal 
display (LCD) panel, below the touch-screen display, which provides a digital display 
of the time, ambient temperature and climate control temperature settings.

When the touch-screen is activated, it automatically displays the audio mode 
previously used.  The touch controls for the other systems are displayed by pressing 
the appropriate perimeter button.  

Selecting 'User Options' provides a wide range of choices, including selection of 
language and units of measurement (either imperial or metric) for use with the 
navigation system.  'Volume Set-up' provides touch-control adjustment of volume for 
the navigation, voice control, phone, traffic information and automatic volume control 
(AVC) systems.  AVC automatically adjusts audio volume relative to vehicle speed.

Screen brightness and contrast can be adjusted manually, and dimmed for night 
driving.  This can be achieved either manually via the 'Day' and 'Night' touch 
controls, or automatically via selection of the 'Auto' touch-control and subsequent 
operation of the vehicle exterior light switch.  

The screen display can be blanked out at any time when the 'System Menu' is in use, 
by selecting the 'Screen Off' touch control.  The display is restored again simply by 
touching the screen.  Alternatively, the Jaguar logo can be displayed by selecting 
'Screen Saver'.


Optical data network

The foundation of the X-TYPE's integrated multimedia system is a Digital Data Bus 
(D2B/DDB) optical data network.  This wide-band 'ring' of optical fibres links the 
various electronic modules of the multimedia system, and provides a high-speed data 
'backbone' within the car to support the introduction of new features and services, as 
and when they are introduced.  

Fibre optics, as opposed to conventional copper/coaxial cable, reduces complexity, 
saves weight, space and cost, and provides the fastest and highest quality data 
transfer possible.  A single, 1mm optical fibre can carry numerous pieces of 
information simultaneously, between different modules.  Signals are transmitted 
through the fibre from one module to another by visible red light, pulsed at nearly six 
million times a second.  The pulses are grouped into a continuous series of 'data 
frames' which circulate the ring 44,100 times a second, the same frequency as a CD 
audio data sample.  Data is loaded or unloaded by each of the modules, as required.



DVD-based satellite navigation system

The X-TYPE's fully integrated, DVD-based satellite navigation system comes as 
standard with the touch-screen display and is available as a line-fit option on all 
models.  The DVD technology employed by the system was introduced as a world-first 
last year on Jaguar XJ Series saloon and XK Series sports car models.

A key feature of the system is high-quality 'voice guidance', selectable in nine 
languages (UK English/US English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, 
Swedish, Danish and Japanese).  The driver is guided by audible instructions, 
complemented by visual map and turn information, displayed on the LCD screen.  
Flexible display options include full or split-screen views, supplemented by turn list or 
arrow guidance with detailed intersection information at times of manoeuvre.

Where optional voice activation is fitted, the system also offers destination setting via 
voice-activated 'name tags', in three languages (German, Italian and English – UK, 
US, Australian and Irish dialects).  In Japan, voice-activated full address entry via 
natural language input will be available. 

Mapping coverage is extensive, with 17 major markets planned to be available on 
DVD for the X-TYPE's launch (UK, France, Germany, Belgium, Holland, Luxembourg, 
Italy, Switzerland, Austria, Sweden, Denmark, Spain, Portugal, USA, Canada, Japan 
and Australia).

Using signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites, combined with 
information from the vehicle sensors and data from detailed maps stored on Digital 
Versatile Disc (DVD), the system calculates the position of the vehicle and provides 
route information and guidance to a selected destination.  

DVD technology delivers significant benefits over conventional CD-ROM based 
navigation systems.  Approximately eight times as much information can be stored on 
one disc and map graphics are produced much faster, delivering highly accurate 
positional information, virtually instantaneously.  The map DVDs are loaded into the 
navigation control unit in the luggage compartment, and the GPS location aerial is 
concealed beneath the parcel tray.

The navigation system's key features include:

?	Voice guidance – one or more audible instructions and/or chimes will be heard as 
the vehicle approaches each manoeuvre point along the route.  Voice guidance can 
be turned off if required, and will be muted automatically if a phone call is in 
progress;

?	Destination setting via voice-activated 'name tags', in three languages, where 
optional voice activation is fitted.  Additionally, in Japan, voice-activated full 
address entry via natural language input; 

?	Screen guidance – the LCD screen displays a map, overlaid by guidance 
instructions including junction diagrams, turn arrows or turn lists.  Various 
combinations of these features can be selected.  As the route is followed, the 
current location, estimated time (if selected) and distance remaining are displayed;

?	Full or split-screen views, supplemented by turn list or arrow guidance with 
detailed intersection information at times of manoeuvre.

?	Stored locations – these are map locations (memory points) that can be stored in 
the system memory with a personalised nametag (Home, Office, School etc);

?	Way points – can be used to divide a route into a number of sections, up to a 
maximum of five;

?	Avoid areas – up to ten areas, for example known for heavy traffic, can be selected 
as zones to avoid, in which case routes will be calculated to avoid them, except 
where an alternative is not possible;

?	Points of interest (POI) – a database of useful names and addresses, such as hotels, 
restaurants, airports etc, is held on the map DVD and the information can be 
accessed and displayed in different ways, for example by selecting a specific POI 
or displaying all POIs in a particular category;

?	Route setting – destinations can be chosen in a number of ways, for example by 
inputting a specific address or selecting a stored location, point of interest, 
postcode, motorway or road intersection, or a previous destination.

Work is currently underway to enable the integration of in-car navigation technology 
with live traffic information services, provided by Trafficmaster in the UK and 
Germany.  Compatibility with Trafficmaster is already built into the X-TYPE's 
navigation system, so that customers will be able to benefit from this optional service 
as soon as the infrastructure allows.  This will be a dealer-fit upgrade and users will 
need to subscribe to the Trafficmaster service.



Voice activation now available for navigation and TV

The X-TYPE's optional voice activation system is based on that of the S-TYPE, the 
model on which this highly innovative technology was introduced two years ago, as 
an industry-first.  The system provides voice control of primary audio, telephone and 
climate control functions, as well as – for the first time – several functions of the 
satellite navigation system and TV tuner, where fitted.  

Jaguar is the only manufacturer to provide this level of integration, maintaining the 
company's leading position in voice activation technology.  

The number of languages in which voice activation can be used has been increased.  
When Jaguar first introduced voice activation on the S-TYPE, the system responded 
only to commands spoken in the English language, although in a very diverse range of 
English and American accents.  For the launch of X-TYPE, the language set has been 
extended to include German and Italian, as well as English spoken with an Australian 
accent.  Work is well underway to make additional languages available, including 
French and Spanish.

When the steering wheel-mounted 'Voice' button is pressed, a microphone, integrated 
into the header console, picks up the voice commands.  (The microphone is also used 
for the optional in-car telephone, where fitted).  The system provides both audible and 
visual feedback in terms of command confirmation and prompts.  These are 
communicated through the sound system speakers and the message centre display in 
the instrument cluster.  The driver may turn off the audible feedback, if preferred.    

The system responds to a variety of commands, without the user having to pause 
between words – for example: "CD play track 6"; "Temperature 20 degrees"; "Phone 
dial 0123 456 789"; or (if pre-programmed) "Phone dial home" or "Radio tune BBC1".   
For the first time, voice activation also allows the user to select pre-set destinations, for 
example: "Navigation destination  office".  Up to 20 'nametags' can be pre-set by the 
user for the navigation system and radio, and up to 40 for the phone.

Voice control of the navigation system allows route adjustments to be made safely 
whilst driving, such as changing the chosen road preference from major to minor 
roads when experiencing traffic delays in a large town.    Such commands would 
otherwise have to be made when the vehicle is stationary.


Dual-band, fixed GSM phone

The X-TYPE's premium specification Motorola dual-band, fixed GSM phone, available 
as a factory fit option, was originally introduced by Jaguar as the world's first in-car 
telephone of its kind on Jaguar XJ, XK and Daimler models for 2001 model year.

Dual-band technology offers the user a choice of networks and provides optimum 
phone performance and call quality by automatically and seamlessly selecting either 
the 900MHz or 1800MHz frequency bands, depending on local conditions.  

With 8 Watts of power, the phone has a far stronger signal than a 2-Watt portable 
system, a particularly valuable feature in areas where network coverage is weak or at 
times when network congestion is high.  When using an 8-Watt, fixed phone under 
these conditions, the call is far less likely to be lost.  

The new unit offers a number of useful features, including:

?	Voice-tagging, for voice-activated dialling of up to 25 numbers (or, via the voice 
activation system, where fitted, up to 40 numbers).  The phone will recognise 
voice-tags such as "home" and "office", and automatically dial the stored number;

?	A filtering system which cancels out background noise, for enhanced hands-free 
operation;

?	Speech encryption, for confidentiality and security;

?	A memo recording facility, with up to three minutes' memory;

?	A data port, allowing information to be transferred to and from a laptop PC (via 
an RS232 lead) at 14.5 KB per second;

?	The capability to display and compose Short Message Service (SMS) text messages 
via the touch-screen, if fitted.

The telephone is fully integrated with the car's audio system and can be operated via 
the handset, switch panel, multi-function steering wheel or touch-screen, if fitted.  
Hidden neatly away in the centre console, the phone preserves the luxurious look of 
the car's interior and discourages theft.  The antenna is concealed within the rear 
bumper.  


TV tuner

The television tuner – a first for Jaguar – receives all freely available terrestrial 
channels, with stereo TV audio, widescreen picture options and teletext services.  TV 
pictures will only be displayed when the vehicle is stationary.  When the vehicle is 
moving, the system can provide TV audio whilst, for example, displaying navigation 
information on the display.


JaguarNet

The optional JaguarNet system – one of the first of its kind in the world - integrates 
cellular telephone and satellite vehicle location technology to provide emergency 
roadside assistance and access to local information.  JaguarNet connects the driver 
with a dedicated Jaguar Response Centre, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Initially available in the UK, Germany and United States, this state-of-the-art 
telematics system is operated from a compact overhead console, or via the touch-
screen display (where fitted).  The system integrates with the X-TYPE's dual-band in-
car telephone system, which provides optimum performance and call quality by 
automatically and seamlessly selecting either the 900MHz or 1800MHz frequency 
bands, depending on local conditions.  With 8 Watts of power, the phone has a far 
stronger signal than a 2-Watt portable system, a particularly valuable feature in areas 
where network coverage is weak or at times when network congestion is high.  When 
using an 8-Watt, fixed phone under these conditions, the call is far less likely to be lost.  

JaguarNet's emergency assistance feature allows rapid access to police, fire and 
ambulance services.  An emergency assistance call is transmitted automatically in the 
event of airbag deployment – a potentially life-saving feature if the occupants are 
incapacitated and where rapid emergency response is of the essence.

When an emergency call is initiated, either automatically or manually, the X-TYPE's 
telematics system interacts with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to identify the 
vehicle's precise location and direction of travel.  This data is transmitted to the 
response centre, along with the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN), so that the 
response centre can provide details of the vehicle and its location to the appropriate 
services.  (A separate satellite navigation system is not required). 

JaguarNet can also be used to obtain traffic information via the Response Centre 
operator, and details of local facilities and services such as hotels, restaurants and 
petrol stations.


In-car entertainment

The X-TYPE audio system is available in Standard or Premium form, both supplied by 
Alpine.  In both cases, the systems have been custom-designed and acoustically 
developed to optimise the audio 'sound stage' within the vehicle. 

From an acoustic design perspective, what is heard when listening to music is far 
more than the sound emitting from the speakers; it is also the sound that is reflected 
off the surfaces of the vehicle's interior.  With this in mind, the speakers and their 
positions have been acoustically optimised for the X-TYPE's interior.

The 120 Watt Standard system incorporates an AM/FM stereo radio and cassette tape 
player, with four door-mounted, 6.5 inch (165 mm) triple-cone, full-range speakers.  
The 180 Watt Premium system additionally incorporates a 6-disc CD autochanger, 
installed in the boot, and ten speakers: four lightweight, 6.5 inch, mid-bass door 
speakers, four door-mounted 20mm dome tweeters and, packaged beneath the parcel 
tray, a 6.5 inch long-throw sub-woofer with a passive radiator and integral 35 Watt 
amplifier.  A 6-disc CD autochanger is available as an option with the Standard 
system.

Both the Standard and Premium systems can be controlled from the head unit, using 
its large, well-spaced buttons, or (where fitted) remotely from multi-function controls 
on the left-hand side of the steering wheel, or via the optional voice activation system.  
Steering wheel controls, incorporating switches for phone and voice activation, are 
standard on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' models.  Additionally, vehicles fitted with a 
navigation system incorporate touch-screen audio controls, accessed via the 'Audio' 
switch on the left of the navigation control/display screen.

Both audio systems incorporate the following key functions:

?	Automatic volume control (AVC) – increases sound output as vehicle speed 
increases (selectable);

?	Auto Memory (A-MEM) – automatically searches for and stores the nine strongest 
stations on the selected waveband, into preset buttons 1 to 9, or enables stations to 
be selected manually;

?	Radio Data System (RDS) – assists in locating and remaining tuned to a selected 
radio station, including automatic or manual station search and station name 
display;

?	Traffic Announcements (TA) – automatically changes to local or more distant 
(EON) traffic information (selectable);

?	Programme Type (PTY) – allows searching of a station type (news, classical, rock 
etc);

?	Dolby noise reduction (cassette tape mode);

?	Tape direction change – by pressing 'Tape' it is possible to change from one side of 
the tape to the other while the tape is playing, without having to eject and re-
insert the tape.

The radio antenna is integrated into the rear window, the FM element within the 
heater grid and the AM element at the top of the window.


Trip computer with message centre

The combined trip computer and message centre is a standard feature on the 2.5 and 
3.0 V6 'S.E.' models and optional on the 2.5 V6 as well as the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 Sport.  
Located in the instrument cluster, just below the speedometer, the system's LCD 
display provides detailed journey data as well as information on the functioning of a 
wide range of vehicle systems, including security and engine diagnostics (additional to 
the standard range of information/warning lights contained in the instrument 
cluster).  

The trip computer memory stores data for a journey or a series of journeys, until it is 
reset to zero.  Two independent memories are available, to allow two separate figures 
to be recorded concurrently.  Trip distance, average fuel economy and average speed 
can be displayed for each memory.  The trip computer can also display the predicted 
distance that the vehicle should be able to travel on its remaining fuel, based on the 
recorded average fuel economy and fuel consumption.


Air conditioning or climate control as standard

Manual air conditioning with pollen filter is standard on the 2.5 V6 and 2.5 and 3.0 
V6 Sport models.  Fully automatic climate control with LCD screen and combined 
pollen and odour filter comes as standard on the  2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' models and can 
be specified as an option on the other models.

Of particular benefit to allergy sufferers, the standard-fitment pollen filter system 
excludes 100 per cent of pollen particles from the cabin.  Polypropylene fibres provide 
a highly efficient filtration and dust-holding capacity by means of eletrostatic as well 
as mechanical filtration.  

Manual air conditioning is operated by a push on/off button and adjusted by using 
the rotary controls in the facia.  These provide temperature control and six blower 
speeds.  Automatic climate control maintains the cabin temperature at the level 
selected by the occupant.  The heat input, air conditioning, fan speed, air intake and 
distribution flaps are all adjusted automatically to maintain the desired temperature.  
Rear and (where fitted) front screen heating and timed air recirculation can also be 
selected in 'Auto' mode.  Automatic control may be overridden at any time, and it is 
always possible to perform manual selection of fan speed, air distribution, air 
recirculation and windscreen heating.

Automatic operation provides a controlled environment across a temperature range of 
17°C (61°F) to 31°C (89°F).  The selected temperature appears on the LCD screen, 
with the external temperature displayed above.  Both temperatures can be displayed 
in either degrees Celcius (°C)  or Fahrenheit (°F).

Automatic climate control can also be operated via the touch-screen or voice 
activation system, if fitted.

Front seats incorporate side airbags and electric height adjustment

The X-TYPE's all-new seat designs combine comfort, style, functionality and safety.  
(Safety features are covered within that section).  

Front seats incorporate, as standard fitment, side air bags for supplemental occupant 
protection in a high-energy side impact.  The side airbags, designed to protect the 
thorax, are concealed within the outer side-bolster of each front seat squab, ensuring 
each bag remains in the optimum position relative to the occupant, regardless of seat 
position.  The seats are fitted with 'anti-submarine' cushions, designed to resist any 
tendency for the occupant to slide forward in the event of an accident. 

Sports seats, available only on the V6 Sport model, have re-profiled side rolls on both 
the seat cushion and backrest to provide a greater degree of lateral support.  

On all models, the driver's seat cushion is electrically height-adjustable.  Eight-way 
power adjustment for the driver and front passenger seats is a standard feature on the 
2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.'  and optional on other models.  Where eight-way power 
adjustment is specified, there is the option of power lumbar support adjustment.  

Also offered as an option are heated front seats (cushion and seat back), with two 
heat settings.  Both front seats and all three rear seating positions have manually 
height-adjustable head restraints.

The rear bench seat can be fitted with an optional 70/30 split folding backrest, 
enabling a wide combination of loads to be carried.  Release handles for each seat back 
are securely located in the luggage compartment, under the parcel shelf.  A fold-down 
rear centre armrest with two integral cup holders is optional on all models.

Sliding front centre armrest

A sliding front centre armrest, fitted as standard on the 2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.'  and 
optional on the other models, provides added comfort for front seat passengers.  The 
armrest can be adjusted forwards or rearwards to achieve the most comfortable 
position.  The armrest can be lifted to gain access to either the top storage 
compartment of the centre console (or phone, if fitted) or the centre console cubby box 
compartment.

Biggest ever Jaguar boot and outstanding interior stowage

Prominent among the X-TYPE's outstanding stowage capabilities is its impressive boot 
capacity of 452 litres.  This is the biggest boot ever on a Jaguar, reflecting the fact that 
the X-TYPE is designed for a wide range of customer with diverse requirements.  With 
the emphasis on practicality and flexibility, luggage capacity can be increased even 
more by folding down the rear seat's optional 70/30 split backrest.

Four metal loops are positioned in the luggage compartment for attaching straps in 
order to secure loads.  A wide range of storage accessories is also available, including a 
boot net, roof bars and a selection of bike carriers – see section on Accessories.  

An optional ski hatch with integral ski sack can also be fitted, along with a rear centre 
armrest.  Access to the ski hatch can be gained from the cabin when the armrest is 
folded down.  The hatch has two doors, one opened from the cabin interior, the other 
from the luggage compartment.

The roomy cabin interior also provides a number of useful stowage facilities.  For 
example, the doors have two storage areas – a large main pocket and a secondary 
tray, higher up near the door handle.  A storage box is concealed in the centre console, 
beneath the armrest, and the glove compartment incorporates a stowage net on the 
inside of the lid. 

Reach- and rake-adjustable steering column  

The steering column can be adjusted manually for reach and rake, to achieve a 
comfortable, safe driving position.  The release lever is located on the underside of the 
steering column.

Electric windows with anti-trap feature

Front electric windows, including one-touch up and down operation, are standard 
fitment on all models.  Rear electric windows, also incorporating one-touch up and 
down operation, are standard on the  2.5 and 3.0 V6 'S.E.' models.  

Each electrically operated window has an anti-trap feature.  If an obstacle is detected 
during the upwards movement of the window, it will immediately stop closing and 
move downwards for a short distance.

Electric glass sunroof option

An electrically operated tilt/slide glass sunroof with integral, sliding sunshade is 
optional on all models.  The sunroof can be slid and tilted with a one-touch operation, 
during both opening and closing.  Like the electric windows, it includes an anti-trap 
feature which means that it will immediately stop closing and move backwards for a 
short distance if an obstacle is detected.

Electrochromatic interior rear view mirror option

An automatically dimming interior mirror features a cell construction with an 
electrochromatic film sandwiched between two pieces of glass which are surface-
coated with a conductive layer.  The film is linked to an electrical control circuit with 
sensors which detect glare and compare it with ambient light. 

When headlamp glare is detected at the rear, the control circuit sends a signal to the 
cell, causing the electrochromatic film to darken.  The mirror clears automatically 
when the light levels return to normal, or when reverse gear is selected.


(3)  POWERTRAIN

Powerful, efficient 2.5 and 3.0 litre AJ-V6 engines
The 24-valve, four-cam 2.5 litre and 3.0 litre AJ-V6 engines are derived from the AJ-V6 
powertrain already successfully proven in the larger S-TYPE saloon.  Developed and 
tested at Jaguar's Engineering Centre at Whitley in Coventry, the AJ-V6 engine 
remains faithful to the Jaguar tradition by employing advanced technology and design 
innovation to deliver spirited, effortless performance, competitive fuel economy and 
low emissions.
The water-cooled, 60-degree V6 engines have a forged steel crankshaft with four main 
bearings, two overhead chain-driven cast iron camshafts per bank, and four valves 
per cylinder, activated via direct-acting, mechanical bucket tappets.
Both the 2.5 and 3.0 litre engines feature a four-mode, variable geometry intake 
manifold.  By opening or closing a combination of two intake tuning valves, the length 
of the intake system, optimising volumetric efficiency.  
Both engines incorporate a continuously variable cam phasing system, which adjusts 
the timing of valve opening and closing, depending on engine speed, load and oil 
temperature.  Variable cam phasing allows engine performance to be optimised, 
resulting in  excellent mid-range torque,  improved full-load performance, reduced 
emissions, enhanced idle stability and improved fuel economy.
The combined effects of variable cam phasing and the variable geometry intake 
manifold yield an exceptionally wide torque spread, delivering the effortless 
driveability which is characteristic of all Jaguars.  On both 2.5 and 3.0 litre engines, 
over 90 per cent of peak torque is available between 2500 and 6000 rev/min.  Over 80 
per cent of peak torque is available from below 1500 rev/min, right through to the 
maximum engine operating speed of 6800 rev/min.
The 2.5 litre engine achieves peak torque of 244 Nm at 3000 rev/min, with a 
maximum power output of 194 bhp (145 kW) at 6800 rev/min.  The 3.0 litre engine 
achieves peak torque of 284 Nm at 3000 rev/min, with a maximum power output of 
231 bhp (172 kW) at 6800 rev/min.   The specific power output of both engines is best-
in-class, with the 2.5 litre engine achieving 77.8 bhp/litre (58.1 kW/litre) and the 3.0 
litre engine 77.8 bhp/litre (58.0 kW/litre).

Electronic engine management system
A bespoke Denso engine management system governs the operation of the variable 
intake camshaft phasing system, as well as the electronic throttle, the electronic, 
returnless fuel system, linear air-fuel ratio sensors and multi-hole injectors in full 
sequential mode.  The state-of-the-art, 32-bit Denso system has the capacity to meet 
the most stringent emissions requirements in the world and contributes to refinement, 
driveability and reliability.  
Fuel delivery is determined primarily by a hot wire air meter with subsidiary inputs 
from the coolant temperature, exhaust stoichiometry, air temperature, throttle position 
and engine speed sensors. The knock control system checks for cylinder detonation 
and retards the ignition timing until knock is eliminated.  
	
	Idle speed is controlled through movement of the main throttle blade rather than 
a conventional bypass valve, while cruise control is implemented by the 
controller as an integral throttle function. The throttle has comprehensive safety 
and limp-home features.
	
Refinement: stiff, lightweight structure
The AJ-V6 engine has an exceptionally stiff but lightweight structure, with a heavily 
ribbed, heat-treated aluminium cylinder block, die-cast aluminium bedplate with 
nodular iron main bearing inserts, and a structural cast aluminium oil pan.  Close 
cylinder bore spacing allows a short, stiff crankshaft which is made of forged steel and 
has fully machined counterweights for excellent balance characteristics.  The cast iron 
crankshafts have excellent balance and are driven by dual, low-profile, fine-finished 
'Morse' silent chains.
The front cover is of die-cast aluminium and was carefully designed to minimise 
radiated noise.  Engine accessories are directly mounted to the front cover, oil pan and 
block to minimise vibration.  Isolated magnesium cam covers minimise radiated 
valvetrain noise, which is inherently low due to the lightweight valve gear.  A 
composite lower intake and an isolated aluminium upper intake manifold further 
reduce radiated noise.  The air cleaner and inlet ducts are carefully optimised and 
incorporate a tuned resonator to eliminate intake boom, while enhancing the engine's 
'growl' under certain accelerating conditions.  The full-authority electronic throttle 
eliminates the possibility of engine vibration being otherwise transmitted through the 
cable to the pedal.  
The end result is an engine which affords excellent performance and refinement, low 
overall sound and vibration levels, and a pleasing sound quality.

Fuel-efficient, clean
An electronic, 'returnless' fuel system negates the need for fuel return hoses.  This 
prevents heat from the engine compartment returning to the fuel tank, thus keeping 
the bulk fuel temperatures low and reducing evaporative hydrocarbon emissions.  
Cold-start hydrocarbon emissions are also minimised, thanks to rapid engine warm-
up.  In addition, the variable cam phasing system, in conjunction with the Denso 
engine management system, improves fuel economy and reduces emissions under all 
operating temperatures and conditions.
Such features enable the X-TYPE to meet the European Stage 4 exhaust tailpipe 
emissions standard, as well as the stringent Californian Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) 
standard for the United States and Canada. 
Lightweight, space-efficient
To aid fuel economy, engine weight is minimised due to intensive use of aluminium 
and magnesium components.  These include lightweight powder-sintered and 
fracture-split connecting rods and aluminium pistons.
At the same time, the engine and transfer case are packaged extremely space-
efficiently.  The engines are mounted transversely, which plays an important part in 
overall package optimisation.  The X-TYPE is the first car in the Jaguar range to have a 
transverse engine installation.  
The 13.5 gallon (61.5 litre) fuel tank is moulded from 8-layer high-density polyethylene 
(HDPE), a lightweight material that can be formed into complex shapes, thus aiding 
both fuel economy and space-efficiency.  The shape and location of the fuel tank – 
below the rear seat pan, above the propshaft and exhaust assembly – also plays a part 
in enabling the X-TYPE to boast the biggest boot capacity of any Jaguar.

Key design features of the AJ-V6 engine in summary
?	Rigid, extensively ribbed, heat-treated aluminium cylinder block, reinforced die-
cast main bearing bedplate and a structural aluminium oil pan, braced to the 
transmission bell housing, for a lightweight, highly rigid structure. The cylinder 
block is cast by the Cosworth-patented, precision sand casting process - the same 
process used to cast the AJ-V8 cylinder heads
?	Patented precision low-volume/high velocity cooled cylinder block and heads for 
high fuel efficiency and low emissions
?	4 valve combustion system
?	Direct acting mechanical bucket valvegear with lightweight aluminium tappets 
and lightweight valves
?	Continuously variable cam phasing with optimised cam profiles for excellent 
performance, light load stability, fuel economy and emissions
?	Isolated magnesium cam covers for low radiated valvetrain noise
?	High compression ratio for excellent power and fuel efficiency
?	Lightweight aluminium pistons with graphite/molybdenum low friction coating 
and 4mm top ring land
?	Lightweight, powder-sintered and fracture-split connecting rods
?	Coil-on-plug ignition system, with individual-cylinder knock control
?	Fine wire, platinum tipped spark plugs for extended durability 
?	Rigid 60-degree twist-forged, steel crankshaft with fully machined balance 
weights, undercut rolled fillets and heat treated pins and journals
?	Low profile, fine finished "Morse" silent dual chain drive with one hydraulic 
tensioner for each chain 
?	Moderately oversquare bore/stroke  (81.6/79.5 mm for the 2.5 litre engine and 
89.0/79.5 for the 3.0 litre, giving a bore-to-stroke ratio of 1.03:1 and 1.12:1 
respectively), affording a good compromise between high speed power output, low 
speed torque, fuel economy and emissions 
?	Cast-in, thin-wall iron cylinder liners
?	Low pressure cast, heat-treated 319 grade aluminium cylinder heads
?	Nodular cast iron, high silicon / molybdenum exhaust manifolds on the rear bank 
and fabricated steel on the front
?	Direct mounted engine ancilliaries for excellent NVH performance
?	Durable, high and low temperature tolerant, 6-rib, Kevlar reinforced, serpentine 
front end auxiliary drive belt with automatic tensioner
?	Pressure die-cast front engine cover, optimised for NVH 
?	Four-mode, variable intake manifold system with dual-intake tuning valves, 
contributes to class leading engine performance with a particularly impressive 
torque output across a wide speed range
?	Long exhaust downpipes to exploit V6 engine exhaust pulsation characteristics for 
maximum low speed torque
?	Full-authority electronic throttle control system, with no mechanical linkage 
between the pedal and the throttle butterfly 
?	Nodular, cast iron camshafts, acting on aluminium tappets and steel shims
?	Electronic returnless fuel system with closed loop fuel rail pressure control and fuel 
temperature compensation, for precise fuelling and low fuel vapour emissions

Transmissions
All models come with 5-speed manual transmission as standard.  Electronic 5-speed 
automatic transmission is offered as an option.

5-speed manual transmission

The manual transmission features a cable-shift mechanism which provides efficient, 
precise gear engagement, enhancing the car's sporty feel, and eliminates harsh engine 
load changes via the shift lever, reducing powertrain vibration.  With a final drive 
ratio of 3.8:1, the manual transmission achieves the optimum combination of 
performance, fuel economy and refinement.

The self-adjusting, 240 mm diameter clutch, equipped with a two-mass flywheel for 
vibration insulation, helps extend the service life of the transmission to 150,000 miles 
(240,000 km).  All major components and casings are of lightweight, die-cast 
aluminium, so that the clutch system weighs just 17.9 kg and the overall transmission 
weight is only 47.7 kg, with a fill-for-life oil capacity of 2 litres.

The aluminium gear shift knob features the distinctive Jaguar 'growler' emblem at the 
centre, and has a ring-pull mechanism for reverse gear.  

5-speed automatic transmission 

Fully electronic 5-speed automatic transmission, available as an option on all models, 
is provided by the Jatco FPD transverse automatic gearbox.  The gearbox features a 
wide gear ratio spread, with a low first gear for optimum off-the-line acceleration, 
while the overdrive fifth gear helps to deliver excellent fuel economy and refined 
motorway cruising.  

The final drive ratio of 3.9:1 combines performance and fuel economy, while pre-
programmed software strategies are designed into the transmission system, for 
optimum performance under various conditions.  For example, on uphill gradients, 
the transmission adapts the shift pattern to make better use of engine power and aid 
engine cooling; and when either cruise control or Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) are 
activated, the transmission selects a shift pattern to suit.

The electronic transmission control module co-ordinates engine and throttle control 
information, modifying the shift schedule to provide smoother shifting during 
acceleration and deceleration.  

A low-inertia, slip-controlled lock-up torque converter features a single-friction face 
clutch with torsional damper to achieve a near-locked condition at low speed in high 
gears, enhancing fuel economy and refinement.  The clutch disengages automatically 
before a downshift, for smooth power delivery.

The two-piece, die-cast aluminium transmission casing is extremely rigid, contributing 
to vehicle refinement.  The transmission is a 'fill-for-life' unit, benefiting cost of 
ownership.    

J-gate gear selector

The unique Jaguar J-gate gear selector, designed to accommodate different driving 
styles, is refined for X-TYPE for even smoother operation and lighter loads.

On the right-hand side of the selector gate, the driver is presented with the traditional 
'PRND' layout, in which the 'D' position provides fully automatic availability of all 
five gears.  When driving in gear position 'D' with fifth gear engaged, the gear selector 
can be shifted sideways across the gate to position '4', when the transmission will shift 
down to fourth and the driver may shift between fourth, third and second gear 
positions.  The transmission continues to operate automatically but will not engage 
gears higher than the one selected.

A 'sport' mode switch adjacent to the J-gate enables the driver to select either normal, 
'N', or sport, 'S', modes.  When sport mode is selected, the gear shift points are 
extended to make full use of the engine's power.  
	
Cruise Control

When fitted, the optional cruise control system can be used to maintain a selected 
vehicle speed above 25 mph (40 km/h), without having to use the accelerator.  
Illuminated switches on the steering wheel allow the driver to switch the system on or 
off and to control it through the conventional 'Set', 'Resume' and 'Cancel' buttons.

Cruise control automatically disengages when the brake pedal is applied, or when the 
vehicle speed falls below 25 mph (40 km/h).  In vehicles with a manual gearbox, 
pressing the clutch pedal will also disengage the system.  Cruise control automatically 
disengages when DSC is operating or when the accelerator pedal is used to accelerate 
beyond the set speed for too long a period.

(4)  VEHICLE DYNAMICS


Agility and refinement

Building on Jaguar's tradition of excellence in ride and handling, the X-TYPE is 
engineered for exceptional agility and refinement.  Together with class-leading body 
stiffness, positive steering and the reassurance of all-wheel drive, the X-TYPE will 
satisfy the most discerning driving enthusiast, as well as the everyday driver who 
appreciates an effortless but sure-footed ride.

To quote  Colin Tivey, Chief Programme Engineer: "We set out to engineer a number 
of different characteristics into the X-TYPE, to satisfy a wide range of customer needs.  
The result, you could say, is a car with a multi-faceted personality.  It responds to the 
individual driving style of each owner and adapts with ease to prevailing road 
conditions.  

"The X-TYPE is equally at home on the high-speed autobahn, or driving around the 
local village.  Its inherently sporting personality makes it an ideal car for the driving 
enthusiast who values precise feedback and the feeling of being connected with the 
car and the road." 

Mike Cross, Chief Engineer, Vehicle Integrity, adds"It was also essential for the X-
TYPE to achieve class-leading stability.  Through its superior balance of ride and 
handling, complemented by all-wheel drive, the X-TYPE inspires confidence under all 
driving conditions and particularly in the wet.  Above all, however, it's a car that's fun 
to drive."

Jaguar's first all-wheel drive car

Jaguar's 'Traction 4' full-time all-wheel drive is one of the major factors which sets the 
X-TYPE apart in terms of road holding and safety.  Precise steering, with positive 
feedback and sure-footed, reassuring road holding, is provided at all speeds and in all 
weather conditions.

At the heart of the 'Traction 4' system is the transfer drive, which takes the output 
from the transmission and splits it between the front and rear wheels.  Torque is split 
with 40 per cent directed to the front wheels and 60 per cent to the rear, reinforcing 
the sporting character of the new Jaguar saloon.  

A viscous coupling, incorporated in the epicyclic centre differential, senses differences 
in speed between the front and rear wheels and adjusts torque distribution 
accordingly.  If the rear wheels begin to slip, torque is transferred via the viscous 
coupling to the front wheels, and vice-versa, providing optimum traction and vehicle 
stability.  

The transfer drive assembly is mounted to the engine block, for improved stiffness and 
compact packaging.

The transfer drive and the rear final drive are geared in order to reduce propshaft 
speed, which, combined with precise dynamic drivetrain alignment and balancing 
during production, ensures excellent refinement.  The propshaft is also fitted with 
plunging CV joints to allow for extension and compression, while the underbody 
around the centre bearing is carefully designed to minimise noise transmission to the 
passenger compartment.

Equal-length front driveshafts, coupled with low-friction CV joints, help minimise 
torque steer and improve centre feel.  

Precise feedback from speed-sensitive steering
The X-TYPE's variable ratio, speed-sensitive steering system sets new standards of 
performance for all-wheel drive cars.  The steering plays a key role in making the X-
TYPE feel agile and fun to drive, as well as stable and safe at high speed.
Developed from the ZF Servotronic II system of the Jaguar XJ and XK Series, as well as 
the latest S-TYPE, the X-TYPE's steering provides the optimum amount of power 
assistance, and enhances steering feedback proportionally with speed.  At low speeds, 
the system provides greater assistance, but as speed increases, the assistance is 
reduced in a linear and progressive manner, providing increased feedback for the 
driver.  
The speed-sensitive effect is generated by hydraulic reaction, which increases the 
perceived stiffness of the steering valve and enhances steering feedback accordingly.  
The magnitude of the effect is controlled by an electronic control unit, linked to the 
speedometer and integrated within the instrument cluster.


Unique strut design for precise steering feel
From the early stages of the engineering programme, special attention was paid to 
eliminating the torque that can be transmitted to the steering via the front suspension 
struts.  The aim was to ensure that the X-TYPE's steering feel would not be corrupted.  
While detail changes to the driveshafts, ball joints and strut design went some way to 
minimising this steering sensitivity, the main engineering breakthrough came with the 
design of a unique form of strut top mounting.  A unique inner bearing was developed 
to reduce damper rod friction within the struts, eliminating the unwanted torque.  The 
bearing allows the strut piston to rotate freely, even under the effects of torque steer.  
Steering feel and feedback are further enhanced by 'S-profile' springs which are 
specially designed to reduce strut rod friction.

A positive, centre-feel torsion bar gives excellent straight-ahead feel and improved 
stabililty in cross winds.  This device uses a sprung, mechanical detent which 
effectively locks out the hydraulic assistance just on centre, enhancing the natural self-
centring of the steering system around the straight-ahead position.  

New suspensions deliver sporty handling and ride refinement
The X-TYPE's fully independent suspension system delivers agile, sporty handling, 
whilst retaining the traditional ride refinement for which Jaguar is renowned.  
Twin-tube MacPherson strut front suspension
The front suspension is a twin-tube MacPherson strut design, with a fabricated steel 
front cross-member and 'L' style lower control arm incorporating a 'hydrabush' for 
added dynamic performance and isolation.  
The laterally stiff, steel-fabricated front cross-member is isolated from the body 
structure, conferring a high degree of intrinsic stability, particularly when cornering at 
speed, and delivering significant benefits in terms of ride refinement and quietness.  A 
transverse anti-roll bar, mounted off the cross-member and linked to the strut, 
provides added stability.  
Torsion control link rear suspension
The rear suspension is a torsion control link coil spring system – the first of its kind on 
a Jaguar.  This multi-link system, with mono-tube dampers, allows each wheel to react 
independently, reducing impact harshness, enhancing ride and handling, and 
reducing noise and vibration, particularly for rear seat passengers.  
An added benefit of the torsion control link suspension is overall package 
optimisation.  In particular, the nature of the rear suspension layout played a part in 
enabling the X-TYPE to achieve one of the most capacious boots in its class.
The rear suspension 'H' sub-frame is isolated from the body structure by bushes and 
from the drive-line by rubber mounts, minimising noise, vibration and harshness 
(NVH).  The hydra-formed tubular steel 'H' frame carries the final drive unit of the all-
wheel drive system.
Sport suspension
On the V6 Sport model, suspension components such as springs and dampers are 
specially tuned for even more taut, responsive handling, as are the steering, wheels 
and tyres.  
Class-leading body stiffness benefits chassis dynamics
The X-TYPE's ultra-stiff body contributes to a smooth, stable ride, by providing a rigid 
mounting for suspension components such as springs, dampers and bushes.  Thanks 
to this, the components work to optimum efficiency, isolating the effects of road 
irregularities with little or no transfer to the body.  

By enabling the suspension components to work to maximum effect, the X-TYPE's 
body stiffness plays a key role in minimising noise and vibration, as well as eradicating 
potential squeaks and rattles.  It also contributes to an overall feel of robustness in all 
driver interfaces, including steering, pedals and instruments.  

Braking

The braking system of the X-TYPE features 24mm width by 300mm diameter, 
ventilated front discs, 12mm x 280mm solid rear discs, and a four-channel anti-lock 
system with electronic brake-force distribution (EBD), as standard.  All brakes have 
single-piston, cast iron sliding callipers, and the rear brakes incorporate an integral, 
self-adjusting, ball-in-ramp park brake mechanism.  

A double-diaphragm vacuum booster and electrically driven vacuum pump ensure 
that the discs and callipers operate at maximum efficiency, and contribute to easy, 
responsive pedal feel under all driving conditions

Anti-lock braking system with electronic brake-force distribution

The X-TYPE is equipped as standard with a sophisticated anti-lock braking system.  
The system is four-channel, with independent, digital inputs from sensors in all four 
wheels, and incorporates electronic brake-force distribution (EBD).  

Thanks to EBD, the system not only helps to prevent the wheels from locking when 
braking in an emergency, but also when cornering in adverse conditions, thus 
assisting the driver to maintain full steering control and directional stability in a 
variety of situations.  EBD detects whether a wheel is about to lock and reduces brake 
pressure gradually, without the use of the anti-lock modulator pump.  The EBD 
system is therefore more refined in operation than conventional anti-lock systems, 
while achieving superior wheel control.


Dynamic Stability Control 

Optional Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) links with the anti-lock brakes and steering 
system to help control vehicle yaw, which otherwise could lead to oversteer or 
understeer.  Thus, the system helps to ensure positive handling and roadholding, in all 
situations.

The DSC system employs electronic sensors to calculate actual vehicle motion and 
compares it with the direction initially chosen by the driver.  If the system perceives 
that the driver's intended direction does not match that of the vehicle, it intervenes by 
applying brake force to any required combination of the four wheels.

DSC relies on the speed of communication between many different systems, via the 
vehicle's multiplexed electrical architecture.  The system's electronic control unit 
(ECU) receives data from a number of sensors, including: a steering angle sensor, 
which calculates the driver's intended direction; a yaw rate sensor, which calculates 
oversteer/understeer and side slip (actual vehicle motion); and the four wheel-speed 
sensors, which also form part of the anti-lock system.  In addition, a pressure 
transducer provides brake pressure feedback and an engine torque interface feeds 
torque data back to the ECU.

Wheels

Cast alloy wheels are standard across the X-TYPE range:
?	The 2.5 V6 and 2.5  V6 'S.E.' models are fitted with 6.5 x 16 inch, 10-spoke 
alloys.  
?	The  3.0  V6 'S.E.' model has 6.5 x 16 inch, 5-spoke alloys.  
?	The 2.5 and 3.0 V6 Sport models are equipped with 7 x 17 inch, 5 twin-spoke 
alloys.

Locking wheel nuts are standard fitment on all models.  

All models have a space-saver spare wheel, with a full-size spare available as an 
optional extra.

Tyres

The tyres for the X-TYPE are the result of an intensive development programme with 
two of the world's leading tyre manufacturers – Pirelli and Continental.

The 16 inch wheels are shod with Pirelli P6000 Powergy 205/55R x 16 tyres, while the 
tyres for the 17 inch Sport wheel are dual-sourced from Pirelli and Continental.  These 
are 225/45R x 17 Pirelli P Zero and Continental ContiSport Contact.  

Winter tyres in the same sizes are available as accessories, dual-sourced from Pirelli 
and Continental.

Engineered for refinement

As well as focusing on ride and handling, Jaguar engineers paid equal attention to 
ensuring optimum refinement in every aspect of the X-TYPE's design.  Their attention 
embraced everything from the overall body structure to the smallest individual 
components. 

The class-leading torsional stiffness of the X-TYPE's body structure makes a significant 
contribution to the X-TYPE's overall levels of refinement, including ride and handling.  
By providing a solid mounting interface for suspension components such as springs, 
dampers and bushes, the ultra-stiff body optimises the performance of those 
components to ensure a smooth, stable ride and highly responsive steering and 
handling.
To minimise the transmission of noise and vibration from the engine and driveline, all 
shaft joint angles have been optimised.  The engine is 'cradle-slung', as opposed to 
sitting directly on the frame, and a strong engine block and bedplate design, combined 
with the inherent strength of the compact V6 configuration, enhances refinement still 
further.
The X-TYPE's torsion control link rear suspension design plays an important part in 
reducing road-induced noise and vibration, particularly for rear seat passengers.  This 
multi-link system allows each wheel to react independently, reducing impact 
harshness and enhancing the car's smooth ride and handling.  
The steel-fabricated front and rear cross-members are isolated from the body structure 
in four places by rubber mounts, while the steel-fabricated rear suspension sub-frame 
is isolated by rubber from the main chassis rails, delivering significant benefits in terms 
of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), as well as ride refinement.  The rear final 
drive unit is also double-insulated against the body to give both noise and refinement 
benefits. 
Exterior sound pressure mapping
To minimise wind noise, the X-TYPE has been subjected to more aero-acoustic wind 
tunnel testing than any previous Jaguar, including sophisticated processes such as 
exterior sound pressure mapping.  This has helped to produce an optimum body 
shape, with every component systematically checked for shape and flow optimisation.  

Attention to detail in this area extends to the use of sound-absorbing materials and 
extensive sealing in all crucial areas, including triple door seals, making the cabin even 
quieter.  The car has also been extensively tested for wind noise and overall refinement 
on the open road, including German autobahns.  

Finely tuned components

Another vital ingredient in Jaguar's unique recipe for refinement is the tuning of 
individual systems and components, using a combination of objective and subjective 
criteria.  For example, to achieve the desired ride and handling attributes for the X-
TYPE, numerous component iterations were developed, tested and fine-tuned, until 
exactly the right balance of qualities and characteristics was achieved.  

"Each individual component has an influence on the ride and handling attributes of 
the car," says Mike Cross.  "So to achieve the perfect balance we carried out a great 
deal of testing and fine-tuning.  You could say it's a little bit like making a fine wine – 
part science, part art.  In the end, a lot depends on experience and an intuitive feel for 
what's right."  

As part of the X-TYPE development process, Jaguar engineers collaborated with their 
counterparts at Ford, particularly those who were working simultaneously on the new 
Mondeo.  As a result, the two cars share a limited number of components and 
systems, but these tend to be 'under the skin' technologies which do not compromise 
Jaguar's core marque values and whose source is unimportant to potential customers.  
Jaguar's continuing collaboration with Ford provides a two-way interchange of 
technology, expertise and best practice, which not only benefits both companies but 
ultimately the consumer.

Rigorous proving

All aspects of the X-TYPE's ride and handling, as well as many other elements of the 
car's overall quality and reliability, were tested to the limit during extensive proving 
trials across the globe.  

Rigorous proving was carried out in a wide variety of climates and countries, 
including the UK, USA, Canada, Germany, Spain, Sweden and Italy.  Test sites 
ranged from frozen lakes in northern Sweden to the arid heat of Arizona.  In addition, 
prototypes were subjected, under controlled conditions, to extremes of heat and cold, 
ranging from temperatures in excess of 50°C to below minus 40°C.  Aspects such as 
leak-proofing and corrosion resistance were also tested, under numerous combinations 
of temperature and humidity.

Engine and vehicle durability was tested to the limit whilst driving flat-out at the 
Nardo test track in southern Italy for over 25,000 miles.  Meanwhile, handling and 
stability came under close scrutiny at the Nordschleife, Germany's original 
Nόrburgring, generally regarded as the most demanding motor racing circuit in the 
world.  Jaguar is using this circuit increasingly, and has established a secret workshop 
facility nearby.  The company believes that consistently excellent performance there is 
an essential criterion in proving the credentials of its cars, especially for the highly 
demanding German market.  

Such rigorous, thorough and extensive testing is a fundamental part of every new 
Jaguar model development, helping to ensure world-class levels of durability, quality 
and reliability.

(5)  SECURITY

Continuing Jaguar's long-standing commitment to providing state-of-the-art security 
and locking systems, the X-TYPE is comprehensively equipped to provide reassuring 
protection against theft of, or from, the vehicle.  The security systems exceed the 
stringent British Insurance Industry's Criteria for Vehicle Security.

Engine immobilisation system

The X-TYPE's security systems are controlled by the multiplexed body electrical 
system.  Integration of the security system with the vehicle electronics and engine 
management systems make it extremely difficult for a thief to penetrate or steal the 
car.  
	
	The sophisticated engine immobilisation system is integral with the engine 
management system, shutting down all fuelling, ignition and cranking functions.  A 
uniquely coded transponder is located in the ignition key head to individually identify 
the key.  Over 34 billion code combinations are available and include encrypted data 
for security against copying.
	
Integrated key transmitter

The security systems are operated remotely by a Radio Frequency, battery-operated 
integrated key transmitter.  The transmitter uses a random encrypted code algorithm, 
which provides over four billion combinations of fixed and encrypted rolling codes 
each time the system is used, overcoming the problem of signal grabbing faced by 
conventional RF systems.  

The engine can only be activated by inserting the ignition key, which initiates a 
sophisticated decoding process to validate the transponder code.  This involves three-
way communication of a coded algorithm between the instrument cluster, engine 
control module and key transponder.  The agreement of all three systems on the 
transponder coding is necessary before the engine is allowed to start.

	A battery backed sounder will activate the alarm if either the vehicle battery or the 
alarm sounder is disconnected when the security system is armed.

Additional security features include:

?	Perimeter sensing of doors, bonnet and boot, causing the vehicle alarm to sound if 
they are tampered with;

?	Intrusion sensing via ultrasonic sensors integrated into the overhead console, 
causing the vehicle alarm to sound if movement is detected within the cabin;

?	Inclination (tilt) sensing can be specified as an option to protect against 
unauthorised towing away or jacking up;

?	Integrated LED in the centre console, indicating to owner and thief alike that all 
systems are armed and active;

?	Global closing of all electrically operated windows and, if fitted, sunroof via both 
Remote Transmitter and driver's door key barrel; 

?	Central locking by key, remote transmitter and interior handle;

?	Double locking (or deadlocking) by key and remote transmitter means that the 
vehicle cannot be unlocked via the interior door handles if the door glass is 
smashed.  The locking system has an in-built 'fail-safe' system to facilitate exit;

?	Drive-away locking ensures that all doors lock automatically when the vehicle 
travels at speeds above 5 mph (8 km/h).  If the vehicle stops and a door is opened, 
provided the engine remains running, the car will re-lock when the door is closed 
and the vehicle is moving.  This feature can be disabled, or reinstated, by a Jaguar 
dealer, if required.  

?	Panic alarm can be used to help to deter a possible offender –  the vehicle alarm is 
activated by pressing the panic button on the key transmitter three times within 
three seconds, when in or near the car;

?	Two-stage unlocking enables only the driver's door to unlock on the first 
operation of the key or remote transmitter – passenger doors can be unlocked with 
a second operation;

?	'Smart' locking helps to ensure that the vehicle is fully secure when locking takes 
place.  If one of the doors, or the boot or bonnet, is open when an attempt is made 
to lock the vehicle using the key transmitter, the vehicle will not lock.  The 
direction indicators will flash five times and the horn will 'chirp' twice to inform 
the owner that something is open and the vehicle is not secure.

?	Security-coded audio system with unique faceplate design.

?	Tamper-resistant odometer – The odometer in the instrument pack is an LCD 
display, with the numbers encrypted and stored in the pack's electronic 
microprocessor software.  The odometer memory position is protected by an anti-
tamper algorithm which provides a high degree of resistance to tampering or 
'clocking'.
 
?	Gearshift interlock system on automatic transmission models, whereby the lever 
may only be moved from the 'Park' position if the ignition/engine is switched on 
and the foot brake is applied.

?	Visible vehicle identification number (VIN) plate located at the base of the 
windscreen, identifying the unique vehicle identification number. Windscreen 
replacement is required in order to remove it.

?	Locking wheel nuts on all models.

	
	In addition, Jaguar and its dealer network adhere to strictly controlled procedures for 
the supply of replacement bodyshells and vehicle keys.  Jaguar dealers keep a log of all 
enquiries for replacement keys and notify Jaguar Cars Ltd of any such request.  

JaguarNet

The optional JaguarNet telematics system, one of the first systems of its kind in the 
world, integrates cellular telephone and satellite vehicle location technology to provide 
emergency roadside assistance, as well as access to local information.  

The emergency assistance feature allows rapid access to roadside assistance and 
police, fire and ambulance services.  An emergency assistance call is transmitted 
automatically in the event of airbag deployment – a potentially life-saving feature if 
the occupants are incapacitated and where rapid emergency response is of the 
essence.

JaguarNet interacts with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to identify the vehicle's 
position and direction of travel.  This data is transmitted to the response centre when 
an emergency call is made, so that exact details of the vehicle location can be provided 
to the appropriate services.  

 JaguarNet is initially available in the UK, Germany and United States.  (A separate 
satellite navigation system is not required).  

'Tracker' vehicle tracing system

In the event of the car being stolen, the Tracker system, available as a Jaguar dealer-
fitted accessory, provides an effective, well proven means of tracing a stolen vehicle.  


(6)  SAFETY

COMPREHENSIVE SAFETY PACKAGE

The X-TYPE is equipped with one of the most advanced and comprehensive 'passive' 
safety packages on the market including, as standard, sophisticated occupancy 
sensing systems, adaptive dual-stage frontal airbags, front seat-mounted side airbags 
and, for the first time on a Jaguar, side curtain airbags benefiting both front and rear 
occupants.  

X-TYPE combines advanced safety technology and excellent structural integrity to 
minimise occupant injury.  As a result, X-TYPE  is expected to achieve a 4-star rating 
in both the European and North American NCAP tests.  

In addition, class-leading chassis dynamics, including all-wheel drive as standard, 
provide a high level of 'active' safety to help drivers avoid potential hazards. 

Sophisticated computer analysis and modelling techniques were employed to ensure 
optimum crashworthiness.  These were verified with a comprehensive, rigorous crash 
test programme, including tests with instrumented dummies to assess the loads and 
accelerations to which occupants would be subjected in an impact.

ACTIVE SAFETY

Active safety is all about designing cars to prevent accidents happening.  An 
important factor, therefore, is how precisely the car responds to driver input.  
Prominent among the X-TYPE's active safety features are the sure-footed all-wheel 
drive system, precise steering, responsive handling and anti-lock brakes with 
electronic brake-force distribution, which all help give the driver maximum control 
under all circumstances.  The optional Dynamic Stability Control system offers further 
enhancement, if required.

The car's efficient ventilation, high level of comfort and excellent interior ergonomics 
all help promote driver alertness and concentration.  In addition, optional equipment 
such as the voice activation system, navigation system, rain-sensing windscreen 
wipers, reverse park control and electrochromatic anti-dazzle interior mirror can all 
help to make driving safer.  

Projector technology halogen front fog lamps and headlamps, fitted as standard, 
ensure a powerful light output at all times.  Xenon HID headlamps, which provide 
more than twice the light of a halogen system, are available as an option.  

The slim pillars and commanding driving position also provide an excellent view of 
the road ahead.

PASSIVE SAFETY

In addition to all its active safety features, the X-TYPE benefits from excellent 
structural integrity and is equipped as standard with a wide range of the very latest 
'passive safety' systems, which enhance occupant protection should an accident 
occur.  

Driver and front passenger occupancy sensing system with dual-stage frontal 
airbags

The driver's seat track position sensor and the front passenger seat weight sensor 
work in conjunction with crash sensors at the front cross-member panel and at the 
sides of the car, as well as front seat belt usage sensors, to determine whether, and to 
what extent, the dual-stage frontal airbags should be deployed.  

This greatly reduces the risk of airbag-related injuries caused by inappropriate airbag 
deployments.  It is especially beneficial for smaller front-seat occupants who, despite 
the generally high level of protection provided by airbags, tend to run a higher risk of 
airbag-related injury.

The driver's airbag also features a star-fold pattern for radial deployment, further 
reducing the risk of airbag-induced injury, particularly to drivers seated close to the 
wheel.  Conventional airbags unfold in front of the driver and can cause abrasion by 
the bag fabric moving across the driver's face.

Driver's seat track position sensor

An electronic sensor in the driver's seat track measures the distance of the driver's seat 
from the steering wheel.  At the same time, crash sensors at the front cross-member 
panel and at the sides of the car gauge the severity of an impact.  Each sensor feeds 
information to the system's central processor, which governs the use of seat belt pre-
tensioners and the deployment of the dual-stage frontal airbag.  

The 45-litre airbag is inflated either fully or partly, in accordance with occupant data 
and the severity of the impact, ensuring the most appropriate degree of protection.  

Front passenger seat weight sensor

A pressure sensing system in the front passenger seat detects the presence and 
approximate weight of the occupant – an important factor in determining whether, 
and to what extent, the 120-litre, dual-stage frontal airbag should be deployed, and 
whether or not the side airbag should be activated.  If the front passenger seat is 
empty, or if it is occupied by, for example, a small child, then the front passenger chest 
and side airbags will not deploy.  

Pressure is detected by a silicon-filled bladder, located between the seat pan and the 
base of the seat foam.  Data from the front passenger seat weight sensor is combined 
with that from the crash sensors at the front cross-member panel and at the sides of 
the car.  Based on this information, the central processor governs the use of seat belt 
pre-tensioners and the deployment mode of the dual-stage frontal airbag.  

An additional, secondary benefit is the avoidance of repair costs and inconvenience 
associated with unnecessary airbag deployments, particularly when the passenger 
seat is unoccupied and in low-impact collisions when the occupants are belted.

Side airbags for driver and front passenger 

In the event of a high energy side impact, the side airbags provide supplemental 
protection for the side of the rib cage.  The Jaguar design comprises  an 11-litre airbag, 
incorporated into the outer side bolster of each front seat squab.  This ensures that the 
airbag remains in the optimum position relative to the occupant, regardless of seat 
adjustment.  Only the airbag on the side of the car that is struck will be fired.

Side curtain airbags for front and rear occupants 

The X-TYPE is the first Jaguar to include side curtain airbags, for the protection of 
front and rear occupants' heads during a severe side impact.  The airbags, one on each 
side of the car, are located above the doors, between the headlining and the door seals.  
On impact, the bag deploys downwards and is tethered at either end to ensure it is 
held in position across the windows.

Like all the X-TYPE's airbags and safety systems, the curtain airbags underwent 
extensive and rigorous testing, including highly accurate computer simulations 
followed by 'real life' validation using instrumented dummies.  One of the critical tests 
in determining the design of the curtain airbags was the 'pole test', which assessed 
their performance during a side impact with the equivalent of a large telegraph pole.

Load-limiting and pre-tensioning front seat belts

Both front seat belts are equipped with a pyrotechnically-fired pre-tensioner in the 
buckle assembly, to assist occupant restraint by retracting excess webbing.  In 
addition, a load-limiting torsion bar enables webbing to be paid out under a constant 
load at the precise moment when the force on the occupant is at its greatest, thus 
minimising the risk of chest and neck injuries.

Both front seat belts are height-adjustable, to any of five positions.  The height 
adjusters, which are fitted to the B-pillar and concealed beneath the upper trim, 
incorporate energy-absorbing material to help protect the occupant's head.

Three three-point rear seat belts and adjustable head restraints

The rear bench seat is fitted with three 3-point inertia reel seat belts.  In addition, all 
three rear seating positions, as well as both front seats, have manually height-
adjustable head restraints to help protect against whiplash injuries, and the front seats 
are designed to prevent the occupants from 'submarining' under the belt in the event 
of a severe frontal impact.

Collapsible brake pedal mechanism

Immediately following a severe frontal impact, when braking will be of no further 
benefit, the brake rod is designed to snap at its thinnest point so that the brake pedal 
will lose its resistance and go to the floor.  This can help to prevent or reduce lower leg 
injuries caused by the brake pedal.

Anti-burst door latches

In the event of an impact, anti-burst door latches help to ensure that the doors remain 
closed, thus maintaining vehicle body rigidity and protecting the occupants.

Structural integrity

The X-TYPE achieves very high standards of crash performance, meeting the world's 
most demanding safety legislation, including the latest European side impact and 
offset frontal impact tests.  The car  is expected to achieve 4-star NCAP ratings in both 
Europe and the United States.  

With class-leading torsional body stiffness, approximately 30 per cent stiffer than the 
nearest rival, the car's monocoque body shell includes one-piece bodyside outer 
pressings and one-piece inner pressings for maximum dimensional integrity.  Likewise, 
the doors are assembled from one-piece outer and inner pressings and are fitted with 
one-piece, high-strength boron steel side intrusion beams.  

For optimum corrosion protection, 81 per cent (by weight) of the X-TYPE's body shell 
is double-sided, zinc-coated steel.  High-strength steels also are used in critical areas 
such as the front longitudinals, seat belt anchorages, suspension mounting points, 
bumper mountings and door intrusion beams.  

Safeguards are also built into certain powertrain components.  For example, the 
propshaft incorporates plunging CV joints and a swaged front tube designed to 
collapse at a predetermined load, thus contributing to an acceptable crash 'signature'.  

Energy-absorbing head impact zones

Energy-absorbing ribs are moulded into the trim panels of the upper A and B/C 
pillars, while the headliner makes use of energy absorbing foam to reduce the risk of 
head injury for the driver and front passenger.  

Deformable fuel tank

The fuel system includes a deformable plastic fuel tank, moulded from 8-layer high-
density polyethylene (HDPE) and located under the rear floor to distance it from side 
and rear impacts.  In a collision, an inertia fuel cut off switch acts automatically to 
shut off the ignition and fuel supply.  The complete fuel system was developed 
through extensive computer analysis plus front, side, rear and car-to-car impact tests. 



(7)  ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION


Company Strategy

Jaguar has a vision of being among the world's leading companies in managing the 
environmental impacts of its business, with a commitment to achieving long-term 
sustainability through sound environmental management.  An essential step in that 
direction was taken in September 1998, when Jaguar became the first automotive 
company in the world to achieve full, simultaneous company certification to ISO 
14001, the international standard for environmental management systems.

Jaguar's strategy is three-fold, aiming to:
?	Further enhance the ISO 14001 environmental management system to provide a 
robust structure for environmental and sustainability management.
?	Initiate programmes to address key sustainability attributes, with priority given to 
product stewardship, stakeholder dialogue, and environmental and sustainability 
reporting.
?	Maintain and extend programmes to enhance product environmental 
performance.

In line with this strategy, the X-TYPE has been developed and manufactured with 
regard to its cradle-to-grave impact on the environment, including the effects of 
vehicle end-of-life.  

Use of recycled materials in the X-TYPE

The X-TYPE contains more recycled materials than any previous Jaguar vehicle.  The 
company is committed to increasing the use of recycled materials within its products, 
in order to encourage the development of markets for recycled material.

On the X-TYPE, for instance, the engine block and many other castings are largely 
made of recycled aluminium, and the sheet steel for the bodywork contains recycled 
metal.  Non-metallic components such as wheel arch liners, heater boxes, insulation 
pads and other non-visible plastic mouldings make use of material from old battery 
casings, carpets, packaging, reclaimed textiles and manufacturing off-cuts.  In total, 
over 23kg of non-metallic components in the X-TYPE are made from recycled material.  

End-of life recycling

Being over 90 per cent recyclable (by weight), the X-TYPE meets or exceeds all legal 
requirements and voluntary agreements for end-of-life recyclability, with the aim of 
minimising the amount of material destined for landfill.  The term 'recyclable' is only 
used by Jaguar where it can be demonstrated that the material is being recycled or 
that it is technically feasible to do so.

Vehicle recycling is a major consideration for the company from the initial design 
stages onwards.  Jaguar performs vehicle teardowns to identify whole-vehicle 
materials usage and optimised dismantling methods.  The information generated is 
used to compile an International Dismantling Information System (IDIS) database, 
which details vehicle information to make dismantling and material separation easier.  
Additionally, on S-TYPE all plastic parts over 100g will be marked with their material 
identification to aid segregation and separation of materials when the vehicle is 
dismantled.

Elimination of hazardous materials

All materials and components in the X-TYPE conform to company standards which 
prohibit or restrict the use of substances known to be injurious to health and the 
environment, such as asbestos, mercury, cadmium and CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons).  
The company's air conditioning systems, for example, have been CFC-free since 1994, 
and all Jaguar dealers worldwide are required to use equipment to capture and 
recycle refrigerant.

Emissions and fuel economy
The X-TYPE meets the stringent requirements of the toughest exhaust and evaporative 
emission standards in the world, including the European Stage 4 and Californian Low 
Emission Vehicle (LEV) regulations.  
In addition to very low exhaust and fuel evaporative emissions, these standards 
demand:
?	that the car has on-board diagnostic systems, which continuously monitor the 
performance of the emissions control system components and alert the driver of 
any problems;
?	that the X-TYPE complies with specific emission limits until it reaches at least 
50,000 miles (80,000 km);
?	that the manufacturer audits the car's compliance with these regulations.
The X-TYPE meets these regulations thanks to its latest-generation engine 
management system, a 'returnless' fuel system, variable cam phasing and an 
electronically controlled engine cooling system.  
Like all other Jaguar models, the X-TYPE is fitted as standard with a low power loss 
catalytic convertor.
Fuel economy has been maximised by paying close attention to vehicle aerodynamics, 
calibration of the transmission shifting schedule and torque converter lock-up, and 
tyre resistance.
The introduction of the X-TYPE will have the effect of reducing Jaguar's sales-
weighted fleet average fuel consumption by approximately 10 per cent.  This will 
represent a cumulative reduction of over 25 per cent since 1990.  The fleet average 
carbon dioxide emissions value will be reduced by a similar amount. 

X-TYPE manufacturing – efficient and clean

Over many years, Halewood has played a pioneering role within the motor industry 
on environmental protection matters.  In March 1996, the plant became the first of 
Ford's worldwide locations to gain global recognition of its management of 
environmental issues, with the award of the (then) draft international standard ISO 
14001, together with the equivalent BS7750. 
In preparing Halewood for the new X-TYPE, Jaguar worked hard to make the 
production process even more environmentally efficient than before.  New initiatives 
included the introduction of new, cleaner Paint Shop facilities, a substantial reduction 
in waste materials, the elimination of all expendable component packaging, the 
minimisation of outbound truck movements and the installation of more energy-
efficient heating and lighting.
Cleaner Paint Shop
Extensive refurbishment within the Paint Shop has produced major environmental 
benefits, headed by the introduction of a water-borne basecoat system, in place of the 
solvent-based paint used previously.   As well as improving the quality of finish, this 
substantially reduces emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs).  New oven 
heater and incineration systems have also yielded major reductions in gas emissions, 
including carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 
particulates.
Further environmental improvements within the Paint Shop include installing the 
highest specification air scrubbers to remove paint over-spray particles before the air is 
exhausted out of the booth.  In addition, the new automation and paint mix room has 
been designed to enable the collection of purge/flushing solvents.  The waste solvent 
and paint is now collected into 12-tonne storage tanks and taken away by bulk tanker 
for re-processing and recycling, instead of being allowed to evaporate into the 
atmosphere.

Packaging and waste management

Jaguar has adopted a material handling strategy at Halewood that aims to use only 
durable and re-usable packaging within the manufacturing process.  The aim is to 
ensure that no cardboard waste is normally produced on-site.

Dedicated, returnable pallets and boxes are used for bringing in major units such as 
bumpers and facia, while standard containers are used for many other components.  
Parts delivered from mainland Europe are generally delivered in collapsible 
packaging, which is hired in for the shipments to the UK, then returned to mainland 
Europe for re-use.

Halewood's contracted waste management company, Onyx, has responsibility for the 
collection of waste across the site.  Onyx has an objective to reduce the amount of 
waste that is created on site and to minimise the amount of waste that is destined for 
landfill.  As part of that objective, Onyx provides line-side containers that allow 
operators to segregate waste for recycling.

Rail transport
Jaguar has constructed a new, purpose-built rail terminal at the Halewood plant, 
which will initially be used to despatch finished X-TYPEs destined for export markets.  
With about 90 per cent of export vehicles leaving Halewood by rail, and each train 
capable of carrying some 200 cars, a huge number of truck movements will be 
eliminated. 
The establishment of a supplier park alongside the Halewood plant also means 
reduced long-distance truck movements, as key suppliers produce components close 
by and supply them direct to the assembly line.

Energy-efficiency
In 1997, an energy-monitoring system was installed at Halewood, to enable the 
collection of energy data and the targeting of areas for energy reduction.  Data from 
over 100 individual meters is gathered, and half-hourly reports are produced.  In 
January 2000 an energy-reporting system was installed, to enhance the ability to 
monitor energy usage and to target more precise areas for energy reduction. 

New, metal halide lighting – two-thirds more efficient than the fluorescent lighting it 
replaced – was installed throughout the plant as part of Jaguar's refurbishment during 
summer 2000.  The new lighting system provides opportunities for further savings, 
with the ability to be run at half-level or even to be switched off altogether when 
appropriate (e.g. in fully robotised areas).

Combined Heat and Power (CHP)

A major project to install a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) scheme at the 
Halewood plant is due for completion by 2003.  CHP units capable of generating a 
total of 44 megawatts (MW) of electricity will be installed. 

The combined generation of heat and power is recognised as one of the most efficient 
ways of using natural gas, providing a cost-effective alternative to the use of boilers 
and the purchase of electricity.  Transfer efficiencies associated with 'traditional' 
energy generation are poor.  For example, for every kilowatt (kW) of energy put into a 
power station, only about 18 per cent is delivered to site.  However, for every kW of 
energy put into a CHP generator, approximately 85 per cent is delivered to site.

As well as being far more energy-efficient, CHP reduces equivalent emissions of 
carbon dioxide (CO2), the principal greenhouse gas, by over 50 per cent.  This 
significantly exceeds the target set by the UK Government for British industry as a 
whole, namely a 20 per cent reduction in CO2 emissions by 2010.

(8)  ACCESSORIES

With the aim of providing even more practicality, flexibility and functionality for a 
new breed of customer, a very wide range of accessories has been introduced 
specifically for the X-TYPE owner.

The choice (to name but a few) includes:

STOWAGE:
Roof bars
Ski/snowboard holder
Bike holder 
Fork-mounted bike carrier 		
Bike lift 
Luggage frame 
Roof box 
Surfboard/kayak holder 
Rear bike rack 
Boot net
6-disc CD holder (boot)
Cassette holder (door casing)
					
DRIVING / TOURING:
Detachable tow bar	
Tow bar electrics (4, 7 & 13 PIN)
Towing mirrors
Rechargeable torch
Tool kit	

PROTECTION:
Car cover
Headlamp covers
Foglamp covers
Splash guards	
Rubber mats	
Boot mat
Boot liner
Protective front seat covers					
Protective rear seat covers
				
SAFETY / SECURITY:
Child seats
'Tracker' vehicle tracing system

STYLING:
Accessory wheels
Valve caps with logo
	
COMFORT:
Lambswool rugs
Side window sun blinds



(9)  ENGINEERING AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT 
PROCESSES 


BEST-EVER BUILD QUALITY IN RECORD TIME

The development programme for the Jaguar X-TYPE was the shortest ever in the 
history of Jaguar.  The programme received Board approval in January 1999 and the 
car was ready for launch just two years later.  Although the car was developed at a 
record-breaking pace, owners of the X-TYPE will benefit from Jaguar's best-ever build 
quality.

This remarkable feat was facilitated by a £20m investment in new, state-of-the-art 
engineering technology and processes.  Building on proven systems and 
methodologies, including knowledge-based engineering and rapid prototyping, the 
new systems gave Jaguar engineers greater analytical power and flexibility than ever 
before.  

Product Information Management

Computer-Aided Design, Engineering and Manufacturing (CAD, CAE and CAM) 
were integrated by a process called Product Information Management (PIM).  
Essentially a method for sharing information quickly and efficiently, PIM integrated 
the many, disparate aspects of the vehicle development process into a unified, 
collaborative whole.

CAD, CAE and CAM tools were used in a wide variety of ways, by various 
departments within Jaguar, as well as by numerous supplier companies.  PIM was the 
unifying factor which pieced together all the individual elements of the development 
process, giving every member of the programme team ready access to the information 
they needed, no matter where they happened to be located.  




Equally important, PIM enabled engineers to see exactly how any component 
modifications that they made would impact on the work of their colleagues, thus 
ensuring the best possible quality of fit between components and optimum 
functionality.  

Single data model

Integral to the successful implementation of PIM was the creation of a 'single data 
model'.  This was the master model for the entire vehicle and all its components, so 
nobody could ever be in doubt about the latest status of any aspect of the development 
programme.  

Engineers were able to access to the single data model at any time, regardless of their 
location, through the Jaguar intranet.  With so many parties having ready access to 
such huge amounts of data, only one person was authorised to modify the design of a 
specific component.  All relevant personnel, including key suppliers, were 
automatically notified of changes as soon as the information was stored, and the 
system informed them of the necessity to update their own designs in order to 
maintain compatibility with interacting components.  In this way, engineering teams 
worked collaboratively and concurrently, toward common goals.

"Effective information sharing not only speeds up the development process, it also 
facilitates more nimble innovation," says X-TYPE Chief Programme Engineer, Colin 
Tivey.  "With everyone working from a single data model, including all key suppliers, 
we can respond much more swiftly and efficiently to changing customer needs and 
market conditions.  And more efficient information-sharing results in better overall 
build quality and vehicle integrity."  

Virtual-reality solid modelling

Every component of the car was stored in digital form, in what came to be known as 
the 'digital buck' (a buck, traditionally, being a life-size vehicle mock-up).  The digital 
buck could be accessed at any time and, using a technique called 'solid modelling', 
components could be viewed, either in isolation or together with neighbouring 
components, in three-dimensional, virtual reality.  

Solid modelling provided a more complete representation than could be achieved 
either with wire-frame or surface models, and enabled engineers to make design 
changes, perform analysis and evaluate the results of a change, more quickly than 
ever before.  In addition, detailed motion studies could be carried out, to simulate and 
analyse, for example, wheel and suspension movements and the opening and closing 
of doors and windows.  As a result, far fewer time-consuming, real-life prototypes 
were needed, dramatically condensing the development lead-time, whilst improving 
the accuracy and quality of the physical prototypes that were built.

Thanks to solid modelling, it was also possible to simulate aspects of vehicle assembly 
and servicing.  This contributes to ease of installation on the production line, and ease 
of access in the workshop.  Ultimately, it will be possible to simulate the entire 
assembly process, creating, in effect, a complete 'digital assembly plant', even before 
the actual assembly line is built.

John Knight-Gregson, Senior Manager - Product Development Systems and Technical 
Services, was leader of the team responsible for implementing the new engineering 
systems and processes at Jaguar.  He says, "The development process for the X-TYPE 
was our most integrated and collaborative ever.  As a result, we delivered the car in 
record time, with enhanced quality and improved reliability.  Everyone benefits, not 
least the customer."


QUALITY PROCESSES

In recent years, influential quality surveys have ranked Jaguar among the highest 
quality manufacturers in the world.  This has come about, to a large extent, thanks to 
a complete re-evaluation by Jaguar over the last ten years of its approach to quality, 
and the introduction of advanced quality tools and procedures.

Advanced Quality Planning

A key quality technique employed by Jaguar is Advanced Quality Planning, a 
structured methodology which optimises product quality by identifying any potential 
problems and 'designing out' such problems so that they never arise.  

The technique covers all stages of development, from early computer-aided 
engineering (CAE) through to statistical process control (SPC) of production processes.  
Anything that might eventually result in a problem, from a squeak or rattle to a major 
system failure, is identified and eradicated at a very early stage.

Having successfully used Advanced Quality Planning during the development of the 
S-TYPE, Jaguar extended its scope even further for the X-TYPE.  In total, 38 different 
quality tools were rigorously deployed across 27 high-priority, 'Category A' systems, 
making a total of 1,026 ongoing quality activities that were conducted throughout the 
X-TYPE development process.

"On X-TYPE, we employed the most wide-ranging set of quality tools and activities 
that Jaguar has ever used," says Graham Tranter, the manager in charge of Quality on 
the X-TYPE development programme.  "As a result, we expect the X-TYPE to provide 
the highest possible levels of product reliability, over a projected vehicle life of 10 years 
or 150,000 miles (240,000 km)."

Robustness

"In simple terms, robustness means looking at all the things that can potentially go 
wrong, for whatever reason, and making all necessary changes to systems, sub-
systems and components, to ensure that those things never happen," says Tranter.

To build robustness into the X-TYPE, a wide range of variables were taken into 
account.  These fell into two main categories: 'control factors' and 'noise factors'.  The 
former are factors over which a design engineer has complete control; they include, 
for example, material specification, surface treatment and dimensions.  Noise factors 
are influences that are beyond the direct control of the design engineer, but to which 
the system or component must be made insensitive.  They are divided into five types:  
piece-to-piece variation, change in component dimensions over time, external and 
internal environment, and customer usage – the way the customer uses and interacts 
with the car.  

Like all Jaguars, the X-TYPE is a 'world car'.  As such, it will encounter a wide range 
of noise factors, all of which could contribute to unacceptable levels of degradation 
over time, if the vehicle were not imbued with a high degree of robustness.  For 
example, X-TYPE must be resilient to the widest extremes of climate; all its systems 
must be equally 'robust' in the cold of an Alaskan winter as in the heat of high 
summer in the Middle East.  It must also respond to all kinds of driving styles, from 
sporty to sedate.

"But that level of robustness in itself isn't quite everything," adds Tranter.  "A product 
may be completely robust for a short period of time, and then something may go 
wrong.  Only when a product remains robust over a long period of time can it be 
regarded as truly reliable.  We're confident that the X-TYPE will meet that 
requirement."




Customer-defined quality

Another fundamental factor in defining 'quality' for the X-TYPE was to identify 
customer needs, translate them into vehicle targets and cascade those targets down to 
system, sub-system and component levels.  Therefore, during the X-TYPE development 
process, Jaguar placed greater emphasis than ever before on both qualitative and 
quantitative market research.  

Jaguar held frequent customer 'clinics' in a number of its major markets throughout 
the world.  Existing customers and potential X-TYPE buyers from each market were 
invited to share their views on key features of the product, including its specification 
and interior and exterior design.  Their specific insights had a direct effect on the way 
the car was designed and engineered.  (See Section 4 – Marketing).

"Quality is defined by the customer," says Tranter.  "The customer wants a product 
that will meet or exceed his or her needs and expectations, at a cost that represents 
value.  We believe the X-TYPE is such a product."


CROSS-FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMME MODULE TEAMS

Throughout the design and development of the X-TYPE, Jaguar employed a cross-
functional team of highly qualified engineers with international product design and 
manufacturing experience.  The core team of 300 Jaguar engineers, based at the 
Jaguar Engineering Centre at Whitley, Coventry, and headed by Chief Programme 
Engineer, Colin Tivey, was organised into cross-functional programme module teams, 
each one responsible for a specific area of development.





These teams, comprising representatives of each of the relevant engineering 
disciplines, other company functions and suppliers, were responsible for achieving 
product targets and developing optimum designs for key vehicle systems.  Thus, the 
flair and ingenuity of Jaguar engineers, so effectively executed on the XK8 sports car, 
XJ Series saloon and S-TYPE sports saloon, were applied to X-TYPE, particularly in the 
areas of vehicle dynamics, refinement and interior ambience.

SUPPLIER INITIATIVES

Representatives from key system suppliers were co-located at Jaguar's Engineering 
Centre and at the Halewood production plant, to provide design and manufacturing 
engineering support from the commencement of prototype build.  As the programme 
progressed from concept to production, the teams evolved and different skills were 
deployed within the same broad programme structure.  

The early involvement of major suppliers, fully integrated into Jaguar programme 
module teams, ensured their full commitment to the programme and a thorough 
understanding of design and quality requirements.  Only suppliers capable of meeting 
the stringent requirements of Ford's Q1 Quality Standard were selected.

JAGUAR WOMEN'S COMMITTEE AND HUMAN FACTORS STRATEGY 
TEAM

To optimise the interior ergonomics of the X-TYPE, Jaguar not only employed an array 
of sophisticated modelling tools, but also involved potential customers in the 
ergonomics development process.  As women represent an important customer group, 
the Jaguar Women's Committee, comprising representatives from all levels of the 
company, also provided valuable feedback.

Early in the development process, a 'Human Factors Strategy Team' was formed, to 
ensure that the X-TYPE would satisfy a wide range of physiological considerations 
such as reach zones, clearance areas and vision lines.





3.  MANUFACTURING

(1)  OVERVIEW
(2) QUALITY-FOCUSED CULTURE 
(3) PLANT REFURBISHMENT
(4)  INCREASED ROLE FOR SUPPLIERS
(5)  MORE EFFICIENT OUTBOUND LOGISTICS
(6)  PLANT HISTORY

(1)  OVERVIEW

?	£300 million investment at Halewood, to create a world-class manufacturing 
plant for the Jaguar X-TYPE

?	Over a million hours of training, including around 700,000 hours 'on-the-job', 
for the 3,000-strong workforce, to ensure X-TYPE models built to Jaguar quality 
standards from day 1

?	3,000 jobs safeguarded at the plant, 500 jobs created at new supplier park

?	Fundamental changes were implemented via a three-pillar strategy:
	Quality							
	Centres of Excellence						
	Culture Change
?	Efficient, modern 'lean manufacturing' processes introduced 
?	Totally new body construction and final assembly facilities installed, plus 
heavy investment in paint and press shops

?	Standardised Inspection Points (SIPs) introduced – a formal inspection process 
to eliminate the causes of quality failure  

?	400 metres of 'squeak and rattle' road surfaces built, to identify any faults

?	Wide-ranging corporate citizenship activities include a £1 million contribution 
to a new training establishment

?	Halewood's strong environmental record strengthened further

?	New rail terminal will transport 90 per cent of finished export vehicles

?	Jaguar's total manufacturing capacity doubled

?	Output at Halewood planned to reach over 100,000 cars per year

The Jaguar X-TYPE is built at the Halewood plant on Merseyside (England), which 
has been transformed as a world-class manufacturing facility, following an investment 
of £300 million and an extensive training and culture change programme.  

As part of that programme, all Halewood employees will have undertaken two-and-a-
half years of intensive training, in readiness for X-TYPE production start-up in the first 
quarter of 2001.  

Extensive training programme drives culture change

Production processes and working culture at the former Ford plant have been 
transformed by over a million hours of workforce training, including around 700,000 
hours of 'on-the-job' training – an average of approximately 350 hours for each 
employee.  

Training programmes for the entire workforce were introduced, which concentrated 
on increasing skill levels and developing more effective new processes, backed up with 
a programme to generate a more open and participative working environment.  This 
was kick-started with two-day workshops on culture change for the entire Halewood 
workforce, run by specially trained employees from all areas and levels of the plant.  

"We also had a perfect opportunity - probably unprecedented in the whole industry – 
to implement a vast training programme after the end of Escort production in summer 
2000," said David Hudson, the Director of Production Operations sent in by Jaguar to 
mastermind the plant's transformation.  
"During the nine-week period before the start of X-TYPE pre-production, virtually the 
entire workforce went through an intensive training programme, covering everything 
from foundation skills like numeracy and information technology, to topics like 
Jaguar's heritage and brand, as well as further work on improving the quality and 
efficiency of each production area."
This comprehensive programme was driven by two imperatives: firstly, to elevate 
quality standards to match the levels of excellence in Jaguar's other plants, and 
secondly, to produce cars in a highly efficient manner by using the latest 'lean 
manufacturing' techniques, within a safe working environment.  
Product coaches
Halewood employees worked with Jaguar's engineers to prepare the X-TYPE for 
production.  Some 500 line operators and supervisors spent time working at Jaguar's 
other plants, experiencing the company's proven procedures and premium-class 
standards at first hand.  
Key Halewood employees, known as 'product coaches', took increasing responsibility 
for each generation of pre-production prototypes, helping to develop efficient 
processes for building the new cars.  These product coaches then helped to train the 
rest of the Halewood operators.
3,000 jobs safeguarded, 500 created
Workforce numbers remain similar to recent levels, with around 3,000 jobs 
safeguarded.  A higher percentage of the workforce now have supervisory roles, 
reflecting the smaller work groups that have been created as part of Jaguar's quality-
raising initiatives.  New manning structures were introduced after the company took 
over the plant, with one group leader to six operators rather than the previous twenty.  
In addition, a further 500 jobs have been created locally with the establishment of a 
65-acre supplier park alongside the plant, to feed components and sub-assemblies to 
the production line on a just-in-time basis.
Although Jaguar considered various locations for building the X-TYPE, including sites 
in Germany and the USA, Halewood was chosen as the best option for a combination 
of financial, production and logistical reasons.  There was also a strong feeling that an 
essential part of Jaguar's heritage is its 'Britishness'.  The decision to build the X-TYPE 
at Halewood was also backed by the British Government, and in February 1998, the 
President of the Board of Trade announced a £43 million package of Government 
support.
Jaguar's drive for quality and efficiency 
Jaguar took over operational responsibility for the Halewood plant in 1998, when it 
was still producing the Ford Escort, which continued for a further two years.  The 
company immediately initiated a comprehensive programme to raise quality 
standards to match its two existing plants at Browns Lane, Coventry, and Castle 
Bromwich, Birmingham.  

Jaguar systematically set about preparing the workforce for the very different 
demands of the premium car sector, with the result that manufacturing quality on 
Escorts improved by 50 per cent in just 18 months.

"The substantial progress that we achieved is down to the people at Halewood," said 
David Hudson.  "With reformed operating practices and a fresh working culture, our 
quality levels sky-rocketed even before any major investment was made in new 
production equipment.  After years of uncertainty about the plant's future, our initial 
challenge was to convince the workforce that Jaguar really meant business, and then 
we had to equip them to help us drive through the necessary changes."
Three-pillar approach
David Hudson and his team introduced a three-pillar approach to enable the 
workforce to achieve the necessary improvements, concentrating on three vital areas:
-	Quality, to bring Jaguar's proven standards to Halewood
-	Centres of Excellence, to introduce new working practices throughout the plant in 
a gradual, controlled manner
-	Culture Change, to build fresh working relationships based on respect and trust.
Such fundamental changes have significantly increased each line operator's personal 
responsibility for production quality and efficiency, and this feeling of pride and 
ownership now permeates the entire plant.
Standardised Inspection Points
Another key strategy in achieving world-class quality levels was the introduction of a 
formal visual inspection process, called Standardised Inspection Points (SIPs).  This 
has established a thorough checking and logging procedure to help identify and then 
eliminate the causes of quality failures.  
A multitude of other quality initiatives have been introduced by Jaguar at Halewood 
since 1998.  Among them is the addition of new facilities for vehicle verification at the 
end of production, including 'squeak and rattle' drive tests on a specially constructed 
400 metre track and a five-mile road test.  The causes of any faults found are traced 
immediately, so rectification can be made wherever necessary in the system.
Lean manufacturing  
Typically, lean manufacturing is characterised by a waste-free, low-inventory 
environment, supported by just-in-time delivery of components and systems.  The 
implementation of lean manufacturing techniques at Halewood increased plant 
productivity by 18 per cent in 1999 and halved the parts inventory, as well as helping 
to improve quality.  
The most visible symbol of the changes was a new 'clean floor' policy, well illustrated 
by the dramatic cuts in the quantity of parts stocked at the line-side.  
New production lines designed for premium quality
The major physical transformation of Halewood took place in the summer of 2000, 
when the plant became one of the busiest building sites in Europe.  Virtually all the old 
production facilities were ripped out and replaced with new lines designed for 
premium-quality manufacturing, modelled on those in Jaguar's existing West 
Midlands plants.

Over 95 per cent of the body construction facilities are new.  Highly-robotised 
Body Construction lines were installed and the 'Trim and Final' area was entirely 
replaced, including overhead trim lines for the first time at Halewood and a much 
expanded final validation area.  
Over two-thirds of the Paint Shop equipment is new and the Press Shop was totally 
overhauled, with all 66 remaining presses fully refurbished.  Glossy new flooring, 
wider aisles, brighter lighting and fresh paintwork in Jaguar's corporate colours 
contribute to a more spacious and cleaner looking working environment, more 
appropriate for quality-focused vehicle production.
Corporate citizenship and environmental responsibility
As a company with strong commitment to corporate citizenship, Jaguar has 
introduced a programme of new local initiatives.  During the line operators' training 
before the start of X-TYPE production, each person spent a week on projects to help 
the local community.  The projects undertaken included work with schools, churches, 
vulnerable residents and the refurbishment of local parkland areas.  

The company has also invested £1 million towards the  'Partnership for Learning', a 
brand-new £6 million training facility on three acres of the Halewood site, created in 
conjunction with other businesses and educational institutions in the Merseyside area.
Halewood has traditionally had a strong track-record on environmental matters, and 
new initiatives for X-TYPE production include the introduction of new, cleaner Paint 
Shop facilities and processes, the reduction of waste materials, the elimination of all 
expendable component packaging, and the installation of more energy-efficient 
heating and lighting.
In addition, a new rail terminal at the plant for transporting the finished vehicles will 
deliver environmental as well as logistical benefits, by cutting out a huge number of 
truck movements.  About 90 per cent of export vehicles will leave Halewood by rail, 
with each train capable of carrying up to 200 cars.
Manufacturing capacity doubled
With the transformation of Halewood complete, Jaguar's total manufacturing capacity 
has been doubled and the plant's output is planned to reach over 100,000 cars a year. 


(2)  QUALITY-FOCUSED CULTURE
Though the physical renewal of the Halewood plant had to wait for the end of Ford 
Escort production in summer 2000, the transformation of the working processes, 
environment and culture began two and a half years earlier.  This provided vital time 
to raise levels of workforce skill, to introduce a more modern and participative 
manufacturing approach and to create a new, quality-focused culture suitable for 
building premium vehicles. 
Once Jaguar took responsibility for the plant, a hand-picked management team was 
sent in, to start preparations for building the X-TYPE.  Leading the team, as 
Operations Manager, was David Hudson, a 20-year Jaguar veteran and previously 
Director of Product Operations for Jaguar's two West Midlands plants, at Browns 
Lane and Castle Bromwich.
It was clear to all that major improvements at Halewood were necessary in operating 
processes, productivity and quality.  Also, relations between management and 
workforce were seen as being characterised by a 'them and us' attitude.
On the positive side, though, the Paint Shop was delivering quality that was among 
Ford's best in Europe, while the whole workforce had the skills and experience for 
high-volume car manufacturing, which was largely new to Jaguar.  There was also 
great pride in the fact that the Halewood workforce had built the car which was UK 
market leader for many years.
Against this background, David Hudson and his team identified transformation of the 
working customs and practices as the most pressing requirement, ironically echoing 
the transformation which the Ford Motor Company itself had found necessary when 
it took over Jaguar in 1990.
"We had to get rid of outmoded practices," said David Hudson,  "and persuade 
people to adopt more flexible working patterns, with the emphasis on delivering 
quality.  Even more fundamentally, we had to get the workforce on-side.  We also had 
to overcome some understandable scepticism and convince them that we were serious 
about delivering change.  Then the investment that the plant needed would follow."
The first stage in the strategy for overhauling customs and practices was the 
production of the 'Halewood Vision', a statement outlining the principles to create a 
world-class manufacturing facility.  The 'Halewood Gateway Agreement' was then 
developed, with the co-operation of trade union representatives.  Every employee 
received a copy of what became more usually known as the 'green book', which set 
out the operating principles required to move the business forward.
With the green book winning general acceptance, work could start on turning 
Halewood into a world-class manufacturing facility, capable of building the new, 
compact X-TYPE Jaguar to the quality required.  This was driven by a process called 
the Ford Production System (FPS), which revolves around 'lean manufacturing' 
principles, where standardised working practices are used to cut out waste and to 
drive quality to consistently high levels.
Implementing FPS, and the manufacturing discipline that it required, presented a 
major challenge but was absolutely fundamental to achieving the necessary 
transformation at Halewood.  So David Hudson and his team introduced a three-
pronged approach to enable the workforce to achieve the necessary improvements, 
concentrating on three areas that were described as 'pillars' necessary to support X-
TYPE production:
-	Quality, to bring Jaguar's proven standards to Halewood
-	Centres of Excellence, so that the FPS disciplines could be developed in a gradual 
way throughout the plant 
-	Culture Change, to build fresh working relationships based on respect and trust  
rather than mutual antipathy.

Pillar One – Quality

Every initiative at Halewood since the Jaguar take-over has had some part in bringing 
established Jaguar quality standards to Halewood, learning from the proven 
approaches in the company's existing plants in the West Midlands.  As a result, 
quality standards during the last two years of Escort manufacture were relentlessly 
driven upwards, with remarkable results. 
"By the time production ended, defect rates had been halved and Halewood was 
producing the best quality Escorts ever.  That improvement was entirely down to the 
people here, because it was achieved before the major investment in plant and 
equipment," said David Hudson.  "For the final Escorts off the line, the workforce was 
already very close to matching Jaguar standards, and we still had six months and  
further training programmes in place to close the final gap.  Everyone was determined 
to build X-TYPE with real Jaguar quality from day one."
As in any large-scale manufacturing operation, the concept of 'quality' at Halewood 
starts with consistency.  A stable production process requires that variability is driven 
out, so this was the first area tackled using the tools in the FPS 'lean manufacturing' 
process for establishing standardised work processes.  As well as ensuring consistency 
across shifts, this eliminates waste such as 'non value-added time' – for example, 
operators having to walk further than necessary to collect components.
Moreover, the line operators themselves are responsible for continuously improving 
the standard, which represented a level of responsibility and expectation from 
management that was largely new to the Halewood workforce.  As well as being 
given the necessary training for their new roles, the operators were reorganised into 
smaller work groups, half the previous size, with just six or seven operators to each 
group leader (or foreman), the same quality-driven arrangement used in Jaguar's 
other plants.  
"The new groups also have considerably more responsibility for the quality of their 
own work, and deal with any problems as soon as they are spotted," said David 
Hudson.  "That way faults don't get covered over or missed later in the build process.  
Quality has become everyone's business, not just the responsibility of inspectors at the 
end of the line."  
Another key FPS enabler quickly identified as a priority was a formal visual inspection 
process, called Standardised Inspection Points (SIPs), which establishes a thorough 
checking and logging routine to help identify and then eliminate the causes of quality 
failures.  The SIP system has proved so successful that it is being adopted throughout 
Ford.
 Many more manufacturing initiatives and new disciplines were put into place at 
Halewood, all co-ordinated from an FPS Centre right alongside the shop floor, and 
familiarly known as the 'war room'.  Charts and graphics around all four walls are 
used to explain the process and to track progress.  But successfully delivering the 
results was largely down to efforts the Halewood workforce: effective 'lean 
manufacturing' demands positive input from the operators at every stage.
To increase understanding and appreciation of the established Jaguar working 
practices, 500 Halewood operators and supervisors went to experience production on 
the company's existing XJ and XK lines at Browns Lane and the S-TYPE line at Castle 
Bromwich, over a two-year period.  
"To work away from home down in the West Midlands represented great personal 
commitment from all the Halewood people involved," said David Hudson.  "But it 
was invaluable, because they were then able to act as 'champions' to lead the 
implementation of Jaguar systems here when they got back.  What's more, I think the 
other Jaguar plants may have learnt a few things from directly experiencing the 
dexterity of people used to working on a fast, high-volume car line."
Halewood employees also played a key role in preparing the new X-TYPE for 
production, helping to build error-proofing into the actual vehicle design. The three-
dimensional computer images used by the product development engineers show 
clearly how the finished car fits together, but do not allow detailed understanding of 
the assembly processes involved, including operator access, ergonomics and cycle 
times.  
Specially trained Halewood 'product coaches' have built each X-TYPE pilot stage since 
September 1999, a total of 160 prototypes, to help identify build problems early 
enough for changes to be incorporated into the vehicle design.  This produced 
appreciable benefits for quality and efficiency in a wide variety of areas. For example:
?	The original plan for fixing the rear axle involved six bolts, all the same 
diameter and colour but of varying lengths, with obvious potential for 
confusing the operator.  The revised plan reduced this to just two sizes of bolt, 
which have been coloured differently to provide an immediate visual check.  
Furthermore, each length is now fitted by a separate operator, building an 
extra check into the process.
?	Fitting the X-TYPE's  engines to the frame that holds the front axle and drive-
shaft was taking up to 20 minutes during pilot build, which would have 
completely clogged up the production line.  So the product coaches and the 
engineering team developed a special handling aid to allow the frame to be 
taken to the engine, rather than the other way around, reducing the process 
time to less than 90 seconds.
This level of involvement in the progression from product development to 
manufacturing was a first at Halewood, with the product coaches working hand-in-
hand with the engineers to resolve the issues that had been raised during pilot build.   
As the plant moved to full X-TYPE production, the coaches were then able to use their 
experience to help train the rest of the line operatives.
Another major quality-driven innovation for Halewood was the introduction of the 
'Andon' system, which gives the operator new levels of control and responsibility over 
his or her part of the manufacturing process.  A Japanese-developed concept, this 
provides a line-side cord for operators to flag up warning signals, should there be any 
form of problem (the word andon is Japanese for lantern).  Though available for safety 
or volume concerns, the real benefit is for quality issues – whether it is a problem 
created earlier but spotted as the vehicle comes into a work station, or an issue which 
arises in-station, that would create problems or additional work later or - even worse - 
would get forgotten and passed on to the customer.
Group leaders respond immediately to an Andon signal within their work group, and 
decide whether the issue can be resolved in cycle at the workstation, whether 
rectification should be done later or whether it is necessary to stop the production line.  
If required, there is an established procedure to escalate tricky concerns immediately 
to progressively higher levels of management, until the issue is satisfactorily resolved. 
So, in conjunction with new 'no blame' and 'no fault forward' policies, the operators 
become custodians of quality and are encouraged to use the Andon system to weed 
out every problem at the earliest possible stage.
Andon cords are used throughout Body Construction and the Trim and Final line, and 
in parts of the Press Shop and Paint Shop.  'Buffers' of six to eight cars are built-in at 
various stages along the production process, so an Andon stoppage in any one place 
does not immediately affect the whole plant.  Daily production targets allow for a 
certain level of down-time resulting from the Andon calls, which are all monitored 
centrally by another system called Posmon, to help identify and resolve recurring 
issues, as part of the continuous improvement process.
Among a multitude of further quality-related initiatives introduced at Halewood since 
1998 are:
?	Trebling the size of the quality systems department, tasked with assuring and 
improving X-TYPE quality.
?	Creating an internal Statistical Process Control department, to train and 
support the production work groups.
?	Taking a lead role within Jaguar for the consumer-driven 'Six Sigma' quality 
procedures, which place tighter controls on areas of high variability.  One 
direct, early benefit was a 90 per cent improvement in material losses on 
pressings for the S-TYPE body sides, which are produced at Halewood.
?	Establishing a new component assurance department, with eight engineers to 
verify the quality of incoming components.  They can also call on the expertise 
of a brand new materials laboratory on site, for checking component 
composition.
?	Adding new facilities for vehicle verification at the end of production, 
including driven 'squeak and rattle' tests on a special track and a five-mile road 
test.  The causes of any faults found are traced immediately, so rectification can 
be made wherever necessary in the system.
?	Bringing all product audits under one central quality organisation, to ensure 
consistent application of customer-focused standards.
?	Rigorous application of Advanced Product Quality Planning disciplines to 
maximise the quality of both products and processes prior to launch.
The all-embracing emphasis on manufacturing quality within Halewood led to the 
plant becoming the first Ford-branded plant anywhere in the world to be awarded the 
rigorous, externally-certified QS9000 standard, recognition also achieved by both 
Jaguar's West Midlands plants.

Pillar Two – Centres of Excellence

David Hudson and his management team swiftly realised that bringing a large plant 
like Halewood to the required level of performance all at once was too vast a task.  So 
the concept of 'Centres of Excellence' was born, where manufacturing improvements 
could be made first within smaller areas through close co-operation and teamwork.
"The Centres of Excellence proved a very effective way of introducing all the best 
practices of lean manufacturing within a manageable area," said David Hudson.  
"The initiatives can be introduced, training done and then the people on the shop 
floor buy-in to the ideas and take ownership.  So, the process becomes sustainable, 
and you can then move on and start in the next area."
As the established Centres of Excellence demonstrated progress, the concept was 
rolled out across more and more areas, until all the Centres of Excellence linked 
together and standards across the whole plant were transformed.
Initially just five showcase Centres of Excellence were established in March 1999.  
Each work group involved took responsibility for generating improvements through a 
specified series of actions, including standardised work processes, improvements to 
component delivery at line-side, a 'right first time' approach and a 'best-in-class' vision 
for general housekeeping.
The most immediate difference was the better cleanliness and tidiness.  Line-side 
'cardboard cities' were cleared away, as new racking and packaging – some designed 
by the operators themselves - was introduced to improve delivery to the production 
lines and to ease component picking.  Benches and lockers were relocated into 
purpose-built rest areas, and better floor surfaces were laid where necessary.  
In one of the initial Centres of Excellence, the entire working area – including 
overhead conveyor systems – was completely rearranged to a much more efficient 
layout which had been designed by the section operators themselves, aided by 
engineering colleagues.  
The improvements in efficiency and quality generated such enthusiasm that Centres of 
Excellence were established for 30 per cent of the workforce by the end of 1999.  By 
the time Escort production ended in July 2000, the concept had been extended 
throughout the plant. 
As well as contributing to major increases in quality, the Centres of Excellence also 
helped Halewood to increase productivity by 18 per cent in 1999 alone and to halve 
the stockholding of parts.  
Over and above these important, measurable improvements, the achievements within 
the Centres of Excellence contributed greatly to a renewed sense of pride within the 
Halewood workforce.

Pillar 3 – Culture Change

"To achieve the world-class quality and production efficiency necessary for the Jaguar 
X-TYPE, we needed a whole-hearted commitment by the Halewood workforce to 
changing the culture within the plant," said David Hudson. "As well as updating 
equipment and processes, we had to win people's hearts and minds, and we set about 
achieving that in a systematic manner."
One of the world's leading consultancy firms on culture change, Senn Delaney 
Leadership, was called in to help.  They began by 'taking the temperature' of the 
organisation with a series of individual interviews and small discussion groups across 
all levels of the workforce, which helped identify the key problem areas and the best 
ways forward.
This led to the creation of the 'Halewood Difference' programme, a series of two-day 
workshops for 30 to 35 people at a time, to help change attitudes within the plant.  
The programme focused on the values and behaviours identified by employees as 
essential to creating a high-performance environment.  Key areas covered quality, 
customer focus, accountability and responsibility, open communication, teamwork, 
adaptability and mutual respect.  The programme was started with the new senior 
management team, and cascaded through all levels of the organisation, so that by 
summer 2000, all 3,000 employees had been through the workshops.  There is 
particular pride that 16 people from all areas and levels within Halewood were 
trained by Senn Delaney as facilitators to run all of the courses.
"This massive culture change was largely driven from within by Halewood people," 
said David Hudson, "and that's what made the programme a major success.  The 
plant is a very different place now to the one that I first joined in 1998.  The two-day 
course proved a highly effective catalyst for change, with people taking lessons back to 
use in their daily working lives, and it gave us solid foundations on which to continue 
building."  
With the end of Escort production in July 2000, the whole culture change process 
moved up a gear.  While new production facilities were installed and then only small 
numbers of X-TYPE prototypes were going down the Halewood lines, there was a 
unique opportunity to implement a wide-reaching training plan for the whole 
workforce.  The programme was devised to emphasise the differences between 
building a high volume vehicle and a premium car like the X-TYPE.
Immediately after the summer shutdown, the first 800 people attended two local 
colleges for 10 days.  The group was able to experience courses designed to develop  
essential foundation skills such as literacy, numeracy and computing.  All the courses 
and modules were developed to enable employees to train in the same work groups 
that would be relevant for X-TYPE production.
The complete training plan covered a wide variety of topics.  There was a further two-
day Senn Delaney workshop, taking forward the 'Halewood Difference' programme, 
plus time on Jaguar's heritage and products, safety and environmental issues, diversity 
and healthy living.  A week was devoted to additional training on lean manufacturing 
issues, led by plant supervisors specially trained for the task.  Time was also spent on 
projects around the plant, such as painting and general cleaning, and a further week 
was used for projects to benefit the local community, as part of Jaguar's commitment 
to corporate citizenship.


(3)  PLANT REFURBISHMENT

To prepare the Halewood plant for manufacturing the new X-TYPE model, Jaguar 
implemented a massive £300 million refurbishment programme.  This involved 
replacing the vast majority of the production facilities, to deliver the exceptional 
quality levels required for a premium sports saloon and the creation of a highly 
efficient 'lean manufacturing' environment.
As well having the capacity to produce at least 100,000 vehicles a year, Halewood 
provides Jaguar - for the first time - with all major production facilities on a single site.  
Press Shop, Body Construction, Paint Shop and the Trim and Final lines are all 
adjacent to each other and laid out for straightforward, sequential production flow.  
The production efficiency of the plant has been further improved by the development 
of a new supplier park alongside.  This 65-acre site has been created in partnership 
with the Speke Garston Development Company and English Partnerships. 
Totally new production lines have been installed in Body Construction and for the 
Trim and Final area, with the latter switching from floor to overhead conveyors as 
part of the overall drive for improved production quality.  Both installations follow 
closely the best practices developed at Browns Lane and the recent Jaguar S-TYPE 
plant at Castle Bromwich.  
The Press Shop has been fully refurbished, including the installation of two state-of-
the-art computerised measuring machines to ensure the dimensional accuracy of the 
metal stampings.  In the Paint Shop, 70 per cent of the equipment has been replaced, 
to deliver the renowned smooth and glossy finish of Jaguar's four-coat paint system, 
again replicating the water-borne system used at Castle Bromwich. 
The plant's basic infrastructure has also been extensively renewed and upgraded, to 
provide appropriate conditions for delivering high quality car production.  
Throughout planning and implementation of the refurbishment, Halewood personnel, 
with long experience of high-volume manufacture, have worked alongside Jaguar's 
engineers to develop the optimum layout for all the new and revised facilities. Months 
of planning were required to ensure that all the different building and installation 
activities could be achieved simultaneously with the product development 
programme.  
Where possible, the plant renewal activity commenced before the end of Ford Escort 
production at Halewood.  This included extensive work strengthening roof trusses to 
support the new assembly conveyors, while still maintaining Escort production below.  
But much of the work simply had to wait until the last car came off the old line on 
July 21, 2000, which was the signal for three months of intensive activity.  
Further complications included the huge roof-span of the Halewood plant, which 
made it necessary to use two of the largest cranes in Europe to gain access to the 
central areas. With the refurbishment successfully accomplished,  Jaguar X-TYPE pre-
production started just three months later, in October, on all the new production line 
equipment, building towards 'Job 1' - the start of volume production - in February 
2001. 

Press Shop
Alone among Halewood's operations, the Press Shop had existing ties with Jaguar, as 
a supplier of the company's body panels since 1993 and of all major pressings for S-
TYPE.  The shop now also produces all the main body structure parts for the X-TYPE, 
and though the presses themselves were not replaced they were extensively 
refurbished and  modernised, and all other facilities were substantially upgraded.
Two latest-generation Zeiss computerised measuring machines were installed to check 
the dimensional accuracy of all pressed parts.  The tool room was completely re-fitted 
to the highest levels, at a cost of £3 million, and it now includes a new direct-cut 
milling machine which is guided directly from the computerised development 
engineering data, shortening time-scales and improving both accuracy and quality.  
Another important innovation in the Press Shop is the new 'customer focus room', 
which visually displays a large amount of quality and safety information for the Press 
Shop operators, as well as the superintendents and team leaders who meet here each 
shift.  The feedback on display even includes comments from car buyers.  Also new in 
the Press Shop are enclosed meeting rooms for the work groups, providing quiet 
discussion areas within the generally noisy environment, as well as being equipped 
with computer and printer.
The 66 presses used to produce the 95 different stampings for the X-TYPE have all 
been given a major overhaul in a 10-month refurbishment programme, to ensure that 
they are fully to specification.  They have also been repainted in Jaguar corporate 
colours and the layout has been rearranged, to create more space around the presses 
plus a new area dedicated to die storage.
A total of 69 new die-sets have been produced for the X-TYPE.  To achieve best 
quality, a new procedure was introduced whereby the supplier was responsible for 
the die right until full quality parts were being produced.  In addition, just three prime 
steel suppliers were appointed, who worked with the plant and the die suppliers, to 
deliver the required quality levels.
Dedicated training programmes have also been undertaken by all the Press Shop 
operators, with benefits including a 50 per cent improvement in non-productive die-
changing times.  

Body Construction

The Halewood Body Shop has been totally re-equipped, to provide a state-of-the-art 
facility designed to achieve an ideal layout for the 'lean manufacture' of the X-TYPE, 
incorporating the latest automation and diagnostic systems.  
The logical new layout ensures the most efficient flow of product through the whole 
body construction area, and virtually the entire installation is at floor level, for ease of 
operator movement.  Lean manufacturing objectives that were successfully achieved 
include: minimised walking distances within each work station, maximised 'value-
added' work; and rigorous management of parts stocks at the line-side.
Body parts and other components are stored in neatly-arranged 'market place' areas 
at the sides of the Body Shop, and are only moved to the work stations as required.  
With all production facilities arranged in orderly straight lines and aisles now 
generally widened to five metres, this provides a much less cluttered environment 
than before.
Increased visibility across the shop also makes it easier for supervisors and team 
leaders to spot any problems as soon as they occur, greatly aided by the introduction 
of the line-side 'Andon' visible warning system which operators immediately activate 
if ever they have concerns over issues such as quality or safety.
In planning the installation, extensive use was made of computer simulation 
techniques to ensure strain-free working conditions for the 163 body construction 
operators and 20 group leaders in each shift.  Where necessary, special handling aids 
have been developed and installed for manoeuvring heavy or awkward parts into 
place, such as the doors.
Industry best practices have been observed throughout, such as the use of the latest 
quality systems and having all fixings applied robotically.  The Body Shop has a total 
of 236 robots, applying 3,775 welds per car.  With overall ease-of-maintenance as 
another key consideration, any robot can be replaced within an hour, and they are all 
from a single manufacturer, a policy also applied to all other key equipment to 
simplify upkeep.  Almost all of the facility has been 'flat floor mounted' which, 
together with a certain amount of built-in 'space protection', gives the flexibility to 
reconfigure the area for any future changes in terms of volume or additional model 
derivatives.     
Over 95 per cent of the body construction facilities are new, though it was possible to 
re-use a few items from the previous production line, such as conveyors, that do not 
come into direct contact with the vehicle bodies.  These items were completely 
refurbished.
Just six weeks were available to achieve the massive transformation within the Body 
Shop, between the end of Escort production and the start of prove-outs for the new 
Jaguar X-TYPE.  To make this possible, while still achieving the optimum layout for 
lean manufacturing, several incumbent Escort facilities were re-located earlier in the 
year – another added complication, but carried out without any loss of production.

Paint Shop

Considerable changes have been made to the Halewood Paint Shop for the Jaguar X-
TYPE, with 70 per cent of the original equipment replaced or substantially modified at 
a cost of over £50 million.  Though the quality required in the premium car segment 
was the main driver of this change, environmental performance has also been 
substantially upgraded.
The largest investment has gone into providing four new spray booths to deliver the 
four-coat paint process used on all Jaguars, rather than the three-coat system used 
previously in the plant.  This involves an extra, initial primer coat, which is then wet-
sanded – another procedure new to Halewood – to ensure a super-smooth and flat 
surface for second primer and top coats.  This helps deliver the sleek and glossy finish 
for which the company's cars are renowned.
Each spray booth has the latest generation computer controlled automation, and is 
located within a 'clean room' environment, with air heated or cooled as necessary, 
humidified and filtered to give the best possible painting conditions.  The introduction 
of water-based topcoat (rather than solvent-based) also helps raise finished quality, as 
well as being more environmentally friendly.  Further environmental improvements 
include high specification 'scrubbers' to remove paint overspray particles from the 
exhaust air and full incineration of all paint oven gases.
Another standard Jaguar practice introduced to the Halewood Paint Shop is the use of 
a 'reflow' oven for anti-corrosion wax.  In addition to the cavity wax injection used by 
many car makers, the Jaguar process goes one stage further, putting the injected car 
into a special oven where the wax melts and runs into the vulnerable clinched joints, 
to give extra protection against corrosion.
Further new facilities include an electrocoat oven, body wash and dry-off oven, and 
new enclosures for enamel preparation and inspection.  These enclosures include the 
latest 'striped' inspection lighting, which is critical for seeking out flaws in the paint 
film.  Most other facilities within the Paint Shop have been replaced, modified or 
updated.
Even before the Paint Shop facilities were upgraded, however, the Halewood plant 
had a record of very high paint quality, following five years of dramatic improvements 
in finish, largely attributable to the efforts of the workforce.  This, together with the 
new 'lean' manning structures, accelerated improvements, with latter Escorts 
delivering some of Ford's highest paint quality in Europe.
The adoption at Halewood of the same paint systems already used at Jaguar's Castle 
Bromwich plant brought specific advantages.  As well as delivering quality levels for 
the X-TYPE comparable with the rest of the company's range, it also allowed the 
Halewood operators to start training for the new process under real-life conditions at 
Castle Bromwich a full year before the start of X-TYPE production.  In addition, 
established and proven Jaguar process controls were already available.
The scale of changes within the Paint Shop necessitated a 12-month programme of 
construction and re-equipping, much of which needed to take place while Escort 
production was still underway.  
The biggest issue was that the latest generation of spray booths needed more 
headroom than was available, as the Paint Shop is situated at first floor level, above 
the Trim and Final lines.  Parts of the plant roof had to be raised by a full five metres.  
This task started in December 1999, which meant that painting of Escorts had to 
continue despite the potentially dirty work taking place overhead.  It is source of great 
pride in the Paint Shop that quality did not suffer, but actually continued to improve 
throughout the period.  The first new spray booth was operational by June 2000, in 
time to be proved on the final run of Escort production, prior to the remaining major 
installation work being completed in the Paint Shop during the subsequent six-week 
shutdown period.  

Trim and Final 

The Trim and Final lines – which include engine installation, as well as the fitment of 
most of the car's interior and exterior equipment – and the Final validation areas for 
the Jaguar X-TYPE demanded totally new facilities in order to deliver the required 
levels of quality.   Only a couple of minor items from the old Escort lines were re-used, 
and these were substantially upgraded.
The most visible change is from the old floor-level conveyor system to an entirely new, 
three-rail overhead Trim-line with the car captive in a carrier, similar to systems 
already in use at other Jaguar plants.  This is smoother and quieter than the old 
conveyor, contributing to a more pleasant and more quality-focused working 
environment, as well as giving much better access for the operators.
The overhead system also improves visibility for easier 'visual management' of the 
whole area.  As in the Body Shop, aisles have been widened for ease of movement and 
line-side stockholding reduced, here to a maximum of two hours.  As well as 
contributing to safety and a better working environment, this airy and more spacious 
appearance is more conducive to a quality manufacturing approach, aided further by 
fresh paintwork and improved lighting.
With only two robots in the whole Trim and Final area, this is a very labour-intensive  
operation, so the operators' sense of ownership and pride is crucial to the finished 
quality and the high levels of craftsmanship.
With large items like engines and instrument panels to handle, there were many issues 
of operator ergonomics to be addressed on the Trim line.  The lead on this work was 
taken by the specially trained  Halewood 'product coaches', who produced over 220 
ergonomic assessments for the plant re-fit.  Their solutions included the installation of 
29 'hydraulic assist arms', to take most of the component weight so the operator can 
concentrate on precise installation.
For other ergonomic issues, early involvement of these 'coaches' enabled product 
design to be rethought.  For example, fitting the protective board at the back of the 
boot originally required the operator to over-stretch, with the risk of potential strain.  
Working with Jaguar engineers, the Halewood product coaches devised an ingenious 
alternative solution for fitting the board from within the vehicle cabin, making the task 
easier and quicker, as well as ergonomically safer.
To meet customer orders, the whole assembly operation is designed for sequenced 
production. Appropriately coloured body shells are picked for the Trim line from the 
body store, and the sequence is notified to suppliers for items such as seats, headlining, 
wiring looms and instrument panel.  On the car's passage down the Trim lines, these 
items are all fitted in the appropriate sequence, together with the engine, axles and 
doors.  Wheel and tyre fitment is fed directly, in sequence, via an automatic conveyor 
from a dedicated facility operated by Pirelli just outside the main Halewood building.
Once complete, the cars come off the overhead conveyors and move into the Final 
verification area.  Here, the blank electronic modules installed earlier are programmed 
to the specific market, specification and customer requirement, using a special 
electronic 'gun', a later generation of the same system used on the Jaguar S-TYPE line 
at Castle Bromwich.  Loading the electronic data at this stage simplifies production, as 
the modules are all identical to this point, and also eliminates the risk of incorrect 
installation.  
As well as the programming, the 'guns' also run test procedures to a much deeper 
level than most car production lines.  Just one example is checking the electric current 
drawn to operate the power windows, to ensure that they will meet Jaguar's lifecycle 
requirements.
Further operations within Final validation include tests on four state-of-the-art rolling 
roads and a water test facility where 1,000 litres of water is sprayed over and under 
the car to check for leaks.  There are facilities alongside to rectify any minor problems, 
prior to the vehicle moving to the next stage of build.  
Jaguar has built 400 metres of 'squeak and rattle' road surfaces here, like those at 
Castle Bromwich and Browns Lane, which are designed to identify any faults when 
the cars are driven over by specially trained operators.  In addition, selected audit 
vehicles are subjected to a five-mile test on real roads outside the plant, as a further 
quality check.  
Any concerns that are raised on either driving exercise can be replicated and checked 
again on a 'squeak and rattle' test rig which has been built within a sound-proof booth 
for more detailed analysis.  This facility is also used as a climatic test chamber for a 
small sample of all production, with a potential temperature range between –20oC and 
+60oC.
Though the quantity and scale of changes required for the new X-TYPE Trim and 
Final area were enormous, relatively little could be done until the last Escort rolled off 
the Halewood line, as the Trim and Final areas for both cars occupy the same location.  
Moreover, there was much less freedom than in the Body Shop to relocate Escort 
facilities in advance.
Some things just could not wait, though.  In particular, the height available between 
floor and roof trusses across the manufacturing hall was 5.5 metres – but the new 
installation with its overhead trim line needed 6.4 metres in 26 separate places.  So 
work on raising the trusses had to start in early 2000, while Escort production was still 
underway, working over many weekends and snatching any other days available.
Nevertheless, that left an incredibly demanding eight-week plan of action just as soon 
as Escort production ceased.  For the first 10 days, the whole Trim and Final area was 
declared a 'demolition zone' in the interests of health and safety, as tonnes of steel and 
other material from the old lines was cut out and hauled away. 
Then it turned into one of the busiest building sites in Europe.  The six new conveyors 
each required twin pits for drives and conveyor lines, up to three metres deep.  
Altogether more than 4,000 wagon loads of spoil had to be removed, including 20,000 
cubic metres of earth and old concrete, all needing to be disposed off safely and 
legally.  Vast quantities of new concrete then poured onto site to line all the new pits, 
including 120 mixer loads of concrete for the rolling road bases alone.
The civil engineering site traffic was so intensive that a special computer simulation 
had to be created to check the volume of traffic was manageable, with an average of 
one traffic movement in or out of the plant every minute throughout 12 or 14 hour-
long working days.  Even so, sections of the plant wall had to be removed to create 
additional entrances.
Because of other activity on site, including refurbishment work continuing in the Paint 
Shop above the Trim and Final area, isolation of key services like electricity, heat, light 
and fuel-fill lines had to be phased with great care.  And to complete the challenges, 
everyone had to work around the seven metre square base for one of the giant cranes 
working on site, which was located right in the middle of the Trim and Final area.

General refurbishment

The comprehensive refurbishment programme throughout the Halewood plant has 
literally gone from ground-level to the roof.
A smart, glossy and durable epoxy floor has been laid throughout the manufacturing 
area, to suit the new 'clean floor' policy which has seen the elimination of line-side 
clutter and the creation of wider aisles and more generous spacing of production 
equipment.  Gangways are now also more clearly differentiated, in darker coloured 
flooring.
The building's interior and production equipment have been freshly painted in 
Jaguar's corporate colours, creating a much brighter and more pleasant effect than 
previously.  At a cost of £3.5 million, and using 137,000 litres of paint for the Body 
Construction and the Trim and Final areas alone, this was apparently one of the 
largest redecorating jobs undertaken recently in Europe.

New, metal halide lighting throughout enhances the smart new appearance, as well 
as providing better quality white light than the fluorescents it replaced.  It is also 
considerably more efficient, saving two-thirds of the energy required by the old system 
to deliver the same level of lighting.  Furthermore, the new system has opportunities 
for further savings, with the ability to be run at half-level for maintenance activity, or 
even to be switched off altogether in fully robotised areas, which can rely solely on the 
emergency background lighting.

Heating and ventilation have also been updated and upgraded.  Ducting has been re-
aligned along the production lines, rather than across them, improving airflow for the 
operators in summer and eliminating cold spots in winter.  An ingenious touch is that 
the direction of airflow has been reversed, now going from Trim and Final towards 
Body Construction, which reduces dust in the later assembly stages.

The plant's fire protections systems have been upgraded, and Jaguar has also 
embarked on a four-year plan to refurbish Halewood's gigantic 265,000 square metre 
roof.  Finally, the main administration building has been re-glazed and re-clad in a 
smart metallic grey finish, to give it an appropriately sleek, clean and contemporary 
appearance.


 (4)  INCREASED ROLE FOR SUPPLIERS

The many process improvements that Jaguar introduced for the X-TYPE programme 
had major implications for the car's component suppliers.  To start with, there are far 
fewer of them, based at 250 locations compared with around 350 for Jaguar's previous 
vehicle development programme, the S-TYPE.  But the most fundamental difference 
was the greater degree of responsibility that Jaguar required from the suppliers on the 
X-TYPE programme, placing the company at the leading edge of development and 
high-volume manufacturing practices within the motor industry.
The X-TYPE was the first programme at Jaguar to use what is called the Ford Product 
Development System – FPDS – which is designed to accelerate vehicle development 
times.  Integral to achieving this, is the use of trusted 'full service suppliers' that have 
the capability to engineer and take responsibility for parts and even complete sub-
assemblies.  One supplier, for example, assembles the entire X-TYPE instrument panel 
and centre console, including steering column and wheel, airbags and audio system.  
This is delivered as a single unit to the Halewood plant, where the production 
operator simply fixes the whole panel in place with just four bolts – a much higher 
level of sub-assembly than on any previous Jaguar vehicle.
To achieve effective joint working, engineers from supplier companies have been 
integrated into the Jaguar development team, with many of them based at Jaguar's 
Whitley Engineering Centre, Coventry, throughout the programme.  To support the 
launch phase of the X-TYPE production, the entire launch team of 200 product and 
manufacturing engineers relocated to the Halewood plant.  Then, to complete the 
loop, a new supplier park has been established right next door to the Halewood plant, 
so key suppliers manufacture and assemble on Jaguar's doorstep.
"The new supplier processes that Jaguar used for the first time with X-TYPE have 
stretched us all," said Colin Tivey, Chief Programme Engineer.  "But with our 
suppliers' active co-operation, I believe we have not just found ways of successfully 
delivering the X-TYPE, but that together we have considerably enhanced the vehicle's 
overall build quality."

New supplier processes and accelerated programme delivery

To achieve the required revolution in the supply process, Jaguar started sourcing for 
the X-TYPE programme earlier than normal, more than three years ahead of the start 
of full production.  This forward thinking was made necessary by the accelerated 
time-scales of the FPDS process, even though it required Jaguar to commit to key 
suppliers before costs were agreed or even full component specifications settled.
This strategy encouraged the X-TYPE development team to make extensive use of the 
most trusted suppliers, especially in areas where timing was most critical.  But 
alongside many established Jaguar suppliers, the team introduced new suppliers who 
could deliver particular benefits to the programme.
One of the key drivers in the choice of suppliers was their engineering design 
capability to support the X-TYPE programme, as 'full service suppliers'.  The tight 
limits on both time-scale and in-house engineering resources at Jaguar demanded a 
greater reliance on supplier expertise than in the past, when the company's own 
engineers may have 'shadowed' even a well-proven supplier, effectively duplicating 
the effort.  
To facilitate the new, more open and trusting arrangements, supplier engineers were 
located directly alongside the Jaguar team at Whitley, and both sides were trained 
together on the requirements of the new FPDS processes.
This close working relationship provided numerous benefits.  Jaguar gained highly 
specialised experts on site from suppliers to answer everyday questions, and these 
supplier representatives also joined in 'internal' Jaguar team meetings for the first 
time.  This improved communication in both directions, ensuring greater 
understanding of the issues facing each party.  In addition, the supplier engineers had 
direct access on site to the computer-aided engineering system being used to develop 
X-TYPE, which enabled everyone to work with changes in real time, rather than 
having to wait for updates to be communicated indirectly.
Selected suppliers were even made responsible for integrating whole sub-systems, such 
as Visteon for the instrument panel, TRW for the occupant restraint systems and Lear 
for the wiring looms and seats.  One result is that 90 per cent of parts for the X-TYPE 
interior are provided by just four suppliers. 
The core Jaguar team kept a watchful eye on supplier quality issues throughout, 
vigorously applying predictive techniques to both part design and manufacturing 
processes, to guarantee finished vehicle quality in every aspect.  In addition, a series of 
new management measures were introduced to suit the more co-operative ways of 
working.  These were partly developed from Jaguar's earlier experience with the S-
TYPE programme but the strategies were extended in line with FPDS principles.  
The original supplier briefings were provided by a 'Target Agreement', which at first 
just provided simple guidance on who was responsible for what.  But these 
agreements grew in detail during the programme to become complete contracts, 
including costs and full specifications.  While such an initially open approach was not 
necessarily easy for either side to handle, it served to force Jaguar and the suppliers to 
identify the programme requirements earlier and more precisely than would otherwise 
have been the case.  This clearer agreement on design up front meant fewer late 
changes, contributing to higher overall quality for the finished vehicle.
Meetings early in 1998 brought together for the first time the sub-teams of Jaguar 
engineers and suppliers working on each of the car's modules, such as the seats.  
Though this was established Jaguar practice, some of these sub-teams were led by 
suppliers, which was a first for the company.

Regular, detailed communication

From the outset, Jaguar recognised the need to maintain regular and detailed dialogue 
with all X-TYPE suppliers, if critical requirements and deadlines were to be met.  The 
co-location of supplier personnel at Whitley was supplemented by much increased use 
of e-mail for fast, direct contact with other supplier personnel.
Monthly review meetings on engineering and product issues were introduced with 
critical suppliers, to confirm status on quality, timing and conformity to objectives.  An 
important part of this face-to-face communication was to increase Jaguar's 
understanding of the impact of changes on the suppliers.  
Another highly effective innovation was a series of 'supplier board' meetings, to 
provide a high-level forum for the top ten suppliers to discuss strategic issues among 
themselves and to agree actions for delivering improvements.  While Jaguar believes 
that the X-TYPE programme gained real strength from this increased communication 
between suppliers, it did surprise some.  In the words of one supplier,  "We got the 
opportunity to talk to other suppliers in the board meetings – unique these days!"
One additional strategy throughout the X-TYPE programme was that other Jaguar 
models should derive benefit wherever possible from the economies of scale achieved 
by the X-TYPE doubling the company's output.   So the X-TYPE team held weekly 
meetings about supply issues with other Jaguar vehicle teams, to ensure that decisions 
were not made in isolation about components that could be used across the other 
product lines.  While this added an extra layer of complexity for the X-TYPE 
programme, the potential for company-wide benefit was clear.

The Boulevard Industry Park and Supply Logistics

Working in close partnership with the Speke Garston Development Company and 
English Partnerships, a new industry park has been established on part of the original 
Halewood site.  Companies that have set up operations there to support X-TYPE 
production include:
-	Conix – front and rear bumper assemblies
-	Lear – seats, carpets, 'noise, vibration and harshness' insulation and wiring looms
-	Infast – all fastenings used on the X-TYPE (instead of, typically, 50 to 60 different 
suppliers)
-	Stadco – body construction sub-assemblies
-	Visteon – instrument panel, centre console and cooling module
As Halewood is located on Merseyside, it is well away from Jaguar's established West 
Midlands supply base, so there are great advantages in having these suppliers 
operating close at hand.  This is especially true as many of the parts supplied from the 
park are either colour-differentiated or very derivative-specific.  
These locally-based suppliers will generally only start the appropriate physical sub-
assembly once Jaguar confirms specific build requirements, just 12 hours in advance of 
the parts being needed.  This is a proven short order-to-delivery system that is also 
used at Castle Bromwich, and supplier planning is facilitated by an early build plan 
six months in advance, followed by more a accurate schedule a week or two before 
actual build. 
Another initiative new to Jaguar for the X-TYPE is the appointment of a single lead 
logistics supplier, who will handle the delivery of all material sourced from Britain and 
the rest of Europe.  These parts are delivered direct to the relevant workstation on the 
production line, in accord with Halewood's 'lean manufacturing' philosophy.  The 
first Jaguar employee who handles the part will be the operator that fits it to the 
vehicle.
Deliveries by the logistics supplier are only made to meet the demands of the build 
programme.  Shipments from mainland Europe are made on a daily basis, while 
supplies from Britain are delivered for each shift.  Some deliveries from smaller 
suppliers are picked up on a tightly controlled, 'intelligent' collection service before 
delivery to Halewood on a daily basis. 


(5)  MORE EFFICIENT OUTBOUND LOGISTICS

Having successfully applied for a £1.8M grant from the UK Government's Department 
of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR), Jaguar initiated the 
construction of a new, purpose-built rail terminal at the Halewood plant.  The 
terminal will initially be used solely to support 'outbound' logistics, for the transport of 
finished X-TYPEs destined for export markets. Around 90 per cent of export vehicles 
will leave Halewood by rail, rather than by road transport, providing both logistical 
and environmental benefits.
Previously, the Halewood plant has received in some components by rail, so the basic 
infrastructure was already in place in terms of a link with the national rail network.  
However, the existing facilities were suited only to the inbound delivery and major 
upgrading was required to enable finished cars to be transported out of the plant by 
rail.
Four new rail sidings were built, each capable of holding a train up to 650m long.  
Most trains, however, will be around 500m in length, with capacity for some 200 cars.  
A secure despatch area was also built where vehicles are sequenced for loading, and 
each car is given an individual bar code, which enables Jaguar to verify its progress 
throughout the supply chain, from despatch to final delivery.  
The cars are loaded onto fully enclosed, double-deck wagons.  Vehicles destined for 
markets outside Europe, such as the USA and Japan, are transported by rail from 
Halewood to Southampton, for onward shipment by sea.  Cars bound for markets in 
continental Europe are taken by rail, via the Channel Tunnel, to the Volvo terminal at 
Esdic, Ghent, in Belgium.  Using the existing, well-proven facilities of a sister company 
within the Ford group provides significant economies of scale.  From Esdic, the cars 
are currently transported by road to their final destinations, though in future onward 
deliveries to more distant European markets may continue by rail.
 


(6)  PLANT HISTORY

Prior to the total refurbishment of the Halewood plant in readiness for the launch of 
the Jaguar X-TYPE, Ford had produced vehicles there for over 40 years.
Key dates in the plant's recent history include:
1990	New Escort launched, following £600m investment.
1991	Halewood's five-millionth vehicle.
1992	Halewood awarded Ford Q1 quality certification.
1993	Production of Jaguar body panels commenced at 
Halewood.  Halewood becomes the first plant in Europe to 
achieve ISO9000.  
1998	Halewood announced as production site for the new 'baby' 
Jaguar.
1998	Jaguar begins transformation of work practices and culture.
2000	Last ever Ford Escort produced on July 21.                                                             
Jaguar implements major plant refurbishment.
2001	Jaguar X-TYPE 'Job 1' (February).


4.  MARKETING

?	X-TYPE is Jaguar's first entrant into the highly competitive, fast-growing compact 
saloon segment and establishes Jaguar as a four-model-line company
?	When the X-TYPE saloon range is in full production, it is expected to more than 
double Jaguar's annual sales
?	New, younger customer groups attracted by an affordable, fresh, contemporary 
Jaguar sports saloon
?	Global marketing campaign includes strong internet presence, with a dedicated 
web site at WWW.X-TYPE.COM.
?	Heavy-weight, multi-national customer research programme guided X-TYPE's 
development and marketing
?	X-TYPE moves Jaguar to the heart of the corporate sales sector for the first time
?	Fully competitive cost of ownership

Accelerating the transformation of Jaguar from a niche player to a major competitor 
in the premium car segment, the new X-TYPE is one of the most significant models in 
the company's history.  While Jaguar is traditionally renowned for its large prestige 
vehicles, the distinctive and dynamic X-TYPE takes the company into the compact 
sports saloon segment for the very first time, attracting new customers to the Jaguar 
marque.
Jonathan Browning, Managing Director of Jaguar Cars Limited, commented: "As the 
smallest and most affordable model in the range, the X-TYPE challenges existing 
perceptions about Jaguar.  Appealing to a new generation of customers, the X-TYPE 
exemplifies Jaguar's new performance spirit, offering a fresh, contemporary expression 
of Jaguar values in a compact, stylish sports saloon.  With all-wheel drive as standard, 
the X-TYPE is also a car for the driving enthusiast."
Positioned below Jaguar's S-TYPE in both size and price, the X-TYPE continues the 
broadening of the Jaguar range, following the launch of the S-TYPE in 1998.   The 
latest model takes Jaguar into the fast-growing compact saloon segment, where it will 
compete with vehicles such as the BMW 3- Series, the Mercedes Benz C-Class and 
Audi A4.
The market for compact premium saloons has grown by around 16 per cent 
worldwide in the past five years, fuelled by the introduction of excellent new products 
and the demand for premium brands at the expense of the non-premium branded 
competition. 

In the year 2000, the sector in which X-TYPE will compete accounted for around 
1,190,000 sales worldwide, of which 30 per cent were in Germany, 30 per cent in the 
USA, 10 per cent in UK and 10 per cent in Japan.  These four markets together 
represent over 80 per cent of world sales.   

As a two-model company, Jaguar sales peaked in 1998 at a then-record 50,220 cars.  
Fuelled by the success of the larger S-TYPE saloon, Jaguar today continues to break 
sales records around the globe.  In 2000, Jaguar sold over 90,000 cars.  When the X-
TYPE is in full production, it is expected to more than double Jaguar's total sales, 
accounting for more than 50 per cent of total Jaguar sales worldwide.  
The largest geographical market for the X-TYPE will be Europe, which is expected to 
account for over 50 per cent of world sales in 2001, rising to 58 per cent by 2004.  The 
United States will take around 30 per cent throughout that time, Japan around 10 per 
cent and the rest of the world six per cent.

New customer base 
The majority of X-TYPE buyers are expected to be new to the Jaguar marque, with 
notably different needs from traditional Jaguar customers.Many will be younger than 
previous Jaguar owners, typically '30-something' professional individuals and couples, 
including some with young families, whose cars have to fulfil a multitude of different 
roles.  These are people who require their cars to have discernible style and 
individuality, but also a high degree of practicality.
"We expect the X-TYPE to attract a significant number of new customers, particularly 
younger people who previously may have regarded a Jaguar as beyond their reach or 
as being unsuitable for their active lifestyles," says Marketing Director, Phil Cazaly.  
"Delivering practicality as well as performance and style, the X-TYPE presents a 
completely new proposition.  It will help us to make rapid advances in areas where 
we have traditionally been under-represented, such as with women drivers and 
amongst 'user-chooser' company car drivers."
At the same time, Jaguar is also expecting the X-TYPE to have strong appeal for a 
slightly older group, still with active lives and now enjoying greater freedom as their 
children have left home.  With its unique blend of style, practicality and affordability, 
the X-TYPE satisfies all these requirements.
The new generation of Jaguar drivers will tend to increase the diversity of the 
company's customer base, too.  The X-TYPE is expected to attract more women buyers 
to the marque in Europe, where female Jaguar ownership has previously been at a 
much lower level than in North America.  It is also likely to increase Jaguar's presence 
in the company car sector by attracting 'user-chooser' converts, through its greater 
accessibility and more youthful appeal.
To communicate details of the X-TYPE consistently to these new audiences, and to do 
so in the 70-plus markets where the car will be sold, Jaguar is undertaking a massive 
global marketing campaign, its most ambitious launch programme ever. 
Traditional marketing tools have been re-thought, such as producing a single product 
brochure concept for worldwide use, a first at Jaguar.  In addition, the high degree of 
computer and internet usage amongst potential X-TYPE customers makes the 'new 
media' an important communication channel.  Coincident with the name 
announcement and the release of the first official company pictures, a global X-TYPE 
internet site, WWW.X-TYPE.COM, went live several months before the car's official 
unveiling, and will be built into a full, comprehensive source of customer information 
by the time the car goes on sale.

Listening to customers

From the start of X-TYPE development, Jaguar recognised that the programme 
presented a particular challenge as the company had no direct experience in this 
segment of the market.  So a long-term programme of product and consumer 
communications research was implemented to ensure that Jaguar's designers, 
engineers and marketers remained in tune with potential customers at every stage.

To enable X-TYPE to meet many differing global needs, the research was carried out in 
up to ten countries at a time, from Europe to South-East Asia.  More localised 
differences within markets were not overlooked, with some key investigations in the 
USA, for example, being carried out with separate groups on the East and West 
coasts.  

Large groups – of up to 200 people at a time - were necessary for much of the work, to 
ensure good representation of the diversity of potential customers, including women 
and ethnic groups.  Structured quantitative investigation with the whole group, using 
questionnaires, was balanced with in-depth discussion with smaller focus groups, to 
deepen Jaguar's understanding still further.

The extensive research programme started by gathering feedback from potential 
customers on the strengths and weaknesses of X-TYPE competitor vehicles, using a 
programme of detailed static and driven appraisals.  Then, once Jaguar's early designs 
for X-TYPE were available, these were evaluated with more customer groups.  As well 
as listening to views on the overall styling proposed for both exterior and interior, 
Jaguar's engineers and designers were also able to discuss important areas in detail, 
such as the boot space and interior package.

Alongside the vehicle-specific enquiries, Jaguar also carried out considerable 
ethnographic research to gain a deeper insight into the key customer groups.  
Information on current car choice and usage was supplemented by much more 
general investigation into customer lifestyles, leisure activities and attitudes.  The 
understanding gained is directly reflected in details like the variety of useful stowage 
locations around the cabin and high-tech options including voice activation and 
touch-screen navigation.

Ethnographic research also fed into the development of the extensive marketing 
communications for the X-TYPE's launch, which were the subject of the final stages of 
major, multi-national research activity, to ensure that the car's unique combination of 
emotional and rational appeal is put over to best effect.


Corporate sales

Capitalising on pioneering work with the Jaguar S-TYPE, the new X-TYPE will play a 
significant role in moving Jaguar from the side-lines into the heart of the corporate 
sales sector. While the marque is already a well-established choice at boardroom level, 
the X-TYPE will make a Jaguar available for the first time to many more mainstream 
company car drivers, especially 'user-choosers'.

Markets like France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland are becoming increasingly relevant 
for corporate sales, joining countries such as Belgium, Britain, Germany and the 
Netherlands where fleet business is long-established. Using lessons learned from the S-
TYPE launch, Jaguar has undertaken early liaison regarding X-TYPE with major fleet 
operators, leasing houses and other key influencers in the corporate sector, to ensure 
good understanding of the vehicle's attributes, as well as sharing advance details on  
other essentials such as operating costs and residual value forecasts.

In addition, the X-TYPE is being launched at a time when pan-European and global 
fleet supply arrangements are increasing at a rapid pace.  This is opening up greater 
opportunities for Jaguar to work with sister company operations at Ford, Volvo and 
Land Rover, to provide greater convenience and efficiency  for corporate buyers.
  
"The arrival of X-TYPE will build further on Jaguar's momentum in the corporate 
sector," says Christine Downton, Manager Corporate Operations.  "In Britain, in 
particular, a comprehensive programme of corporate sales training, sharing best 
practice and specialist support, is transforming dealer capabilities to service the fleet 
segment.  Now, further initiatives such as a dedicated web-site for corporate business 
are helping to make Jaguar one of the most pro-active premium car manufacturers in 
serving company car buyers."


Worldwide franchise development

In anticipation of the launch of X-TYPE, Jaguar's franchised dealer network is being 
developed significantly in all major markets, to provide improved geographical 
coverage and reflecting the growth in sales volume that the X-TYPE will generate.  

	Reflecting the significance of the X-TYPE's introduction, dealers in markets throughout 
the world are taking on dedicated X-TYPE specialists, who will handle X-TYPE 
enquiries, update and maintain the customer database and provide a focus for all X-
TYPE communications.

United Kingdom

The well-established UK dealer network continues to grow gradually, year-on-year.  
In November 2000, there were 95 dealer outlets in the UK, 95 per cent of which were 
exclusive Jaguar operations.  The network will continue to expand as part of a 
carefully targeted strategy to provide better geographical coverage and improved 
customer satisfaction.

Over the last two years, the UK dealer network has undergone a substantial 
refurbishment and development programme to create a warm, fresh and welcoming 
atmosphere, with a contemporary, modern style.  The vast majority of dealers had 
already completed their re-developments by the time the S-TYPE was launched, and 
all will have done so in time for the launch of X-TYPE.
	
Continental Europe

	During 2001 there will be a 20 per cent increase in the number of Jaguar dealers 
throughout continental Europe, bringing the total to more than 300.  The biggest 
increases will be in Germany, France, Italy and Spain, where the dealer network is 
expected to grow by 30 per cent.  The German network had already grown by nearly 
70 per cent following the launch of the S-TYPE, from 67 outlets in 1997 to 111 by the 
end of 1999.  Significant expansion is also planned for Austria, Sweden and Poland.

	Dealerships across the Continent are being upgraded and refurbished, to create a 
consistently modern and welcoming atmosphere, complete with Jaguar corporate 
signage.
	
	Overseas
	
	In Japan, plans are in place for a major expansion of the dealer network, from a 
current level of 65 outlets to 92 by the end of 2003.  Other markets, including 
Australia, Brazil and Taiwan, will see continued growth in their respective dealer 
networks to ensure improved geographical coverage for the higher-volume X-TYPE 
range.


Cost of ownership

Achieving competitive ownership costs throughout the life of the X-TYPE was a key 
consideration during the vehicle's development, and this starts with the car's keen 
prices and high specifications.  
Meanwhile, the X-TYPE's comprehensive security systems exceed the stringent British 
Insurance Industry's Criteria for Vehicle Security.  The car's Category 1, Thatcham-
approved security system, together with competitive repair costs, are expected to 
result in highly competitive insurance ratings.

Early forecasts on residual values for the X-TYPE are strong too, reflecting the Jaguar 
marque's well-established track record in this area, as well as the specific strengths of 
the X-TYPE.  Good residuals also mean that Jaguar is anticipating highly competitive 
lease costs.  Fuel economy is also competitive and, in common with the rest of the 
Jaguar range, routine service intervals are at 10,000 mile (16,000 km) or 12 monthly 
intervals.

Jaguar's commitment to after-sales customer care ensures that the X-TYPE, like every 
new Jaguar, is backed by one of the most comprehensive warranties and service 
support in the industry:

o	3 year / 60,000 mile mechanical and electrical warranty (extendable up 
to 5 years / 100,000 miles at extra cost)
o	Total Incident Management, backed by the RAC, is included in the 3 
year / 60,000 mile warranty.  This provides: 24 hour rescue, towing 
and roadside support; vehicle recovery and 'at home' facility; loan car if 
required; overnight hotel accommodation; comprehensive post-
accident/theft service; full Mondial European Emergency Assistance; 
repatriation of vehicle and driver; onward journey costs where 
necessary
o	3 year, unlimited mileage paint surface warranty
o	6 year, unlimited mileage corrosion (perforation) warranty.

The X-TYPE's comprehensive safety system can also help to reduce ownership costs.  
An added benefit of the advanced occupancy sensing system is the avoidance of 
repair costs associated with unnecessary airbag deployments, particularly when the 
passenger seat is unoccupied and in low-impact collisions when the occupants are 
belted.

to country.

X-TYPE STANDARD AND OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT
			00V6	V6 S.E.	SPORT
			2.5	2.5 / 3.0	2.5 / 3.0
 Mechanical				
 Airbags- front and side, driver and front passenger			n	n	n
 - curtain, front and rear			n	n	n 
- occupancy sensing			n	n	n
 Anti-lock braking system			n	n	n
 Cruise control- with steering wheel audio and telephone controls			O	n	O
 Drivetrain- Jaguar Traction-4 (Full-time All-Wheel Drive)			n	n	n 
Dynamic Stability Control			O	O	O
 Power assisted steering- speed sensitive, variable ratio			n	n	n 
Suspension- touring			n	n	A
 - sport			O	O	n
 Transmission- 5 speed manual with moulded gearknob			n	O	O
- 5 speed manual with leather gearknob			O	n	n
- 5 speed electronic automatic with wooden gearknob to match veneer			O	O
	O
 Wheels
- cast alloy 6.5" x 16" X-10 			n	n/ O	A
- cast alloy 6.5" x 16" X-5			O	O / n 	A
- cast alloy 7" x 17" X-Sport			O	O	n
- spare full size steel 6.5" x 16"			O	O	A
- spare full size alloy Sport 7" x 17"			(O)	(O)	O
 - spare space saver			n	n	n
 Exterior
 Chrome finish grille surround, boot plinth, bumper blades and window surrounds		n	n
	A
 Colour keyed grille surround, boot plinth, bumper blades and de-chromed 
window surrounds			A	A	n
 Door mirrors 	- heated		n	n	n
	- power fold back	O	O	O
 Front fog lights			n	n	n
 Garage door opener			O	O	O
 Headlights- manual headlight levelling			n	n	n
 - headlight powerwash			O	O	O
 - Xenon headlights with automatic headlight levelling   and headlight power wash		O	O
	O
 Heated front windscreen			O	O	O
 Heated rear window with timer			n	n	n
 High level stop light			n	n	n
 Metallic paint			O	O	O
 Rear spoiler			A	A	n
 Reverse park control			O	O	O
 Security- central/double locking and perimeter security system with
 2-stage unlock 			n	n	n
 - inclination sensing			O	O	O
 - intrusion sensing			n	n	n
 Sunroof - glass, electric with tilt, slide and anti-trap			O	O	O
			V6	V6 SE	SPORT
			2.5	2.5 / 3.0	2.5 / 3.0 
Interior
 Air conditioning- manual with pollen filter			n	A	n
 - automatic climate control with pollen and odour filter			O	n	O
 Centre armrest- front, sliding			O	n	O
- rear with 2 cupholders			O	O	n
 Electric windows with one touch open and close and anti-trap	- front		n	n	n
	- rear		O	n	O
 Electrochromic rear view mirror			O	O	O
 First aid kit			O	O	O
 Footwell mats- carpet, front and rear			O	O	O
 Front puddle lights			A	n	A
 Seats - front- manually adjustable with drivers seat electric height rise (2 way)		n	A
	n
 - 8 way electrically adjustable			O	n	O
- 10 way electrically adjustable including lumbar support			O	O	O
- heated (2 stage variable)			O	O	O
 Seats - rear- fold down rear seat (split 70/30) 
with rear centre armrest and 2 cupholders			O	O	O
 - rear head restraints x 3			n	n	n
 Seats - trim - cloth 			n	A	A
- leather 			O	n	A
- cloth/leather sport			A	A	n
- leather sport (perforated)			A	A	O
 - ivory leather (only available with leather seats or leather sport seats)			(O)	O
	(O)
Ski hatch with bag and rear armrest 			O	O	O
 Steering column - manually adjustable for tilt and reach			n	n	n
 Steering wheel - leather			n	n	A
- sport leather (perforated)			A	A	n
 Sunblind (not available with Premium ICE) - rear manual			O	O	O
 Sunvisors- illuminated with vanity mirror, driver and front passenger			n	n	n
 Warning triangle			O	O	O
 Wood veneer- birds eye maple			n	n	?
- grey stained birds eye maple			A	A	n
- birds eye maple door trims			A	n	A
 Communications
 Audio equipment- custom stereo cassette sound system with 4 twin cone speakers, 
  EON RDS, PTY, TA and automatic volume control, CD compatible			n	n	n
- CD autochanger (6 disc capacity)			O	O	O
- Premium sound system with 10 speakers, DSP,  	
  power amplifier and CD autochanger			O	O	O
 - chrome speaker surrounds			A	n	A
 JaguarNet - only available with fixed dual band telephone			(O)	(O)	(O)
 Navigation system (1) - touch screen incorporating controls for audio,
 (only available with automatic climate control) 
  automatic climate control and telephone (if fitted)			(O)	O	(O)
 Steering wheel audio and telephone controls			O	n	O	
 Telephone- fixed dual band (only available with front, sliding centre armrest)		(O)	O	(O)
 Trip computer with message centre			O	n	O
 TV tuner (only available with navigation system)			(O)	(O)	(O)
 Voice activation - audio, telephone and automatic climate control (only available with  			 
steering wheel audio and telephone controls and trip computer with   message centre)	(O)	O	(O)	
 Optional Packs
 Auto Clear View pack- Rain sensing wipers, electrochromic rear view mirror and
  automatic headlights			O	O	O
 Cold Climate pack- Headlight powerwash, heated front windscreen and
  heated front seats			O	O	O
n Standard  O Optional at extra cost  ? Optional at no extra cost A Not available  (O) Linked option  

(1) Country mapping DVD's are available for: 
Europe,  (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal*, Spain*, Sweden, 
Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (except N. and S. Ireland)
Australia
Japan
North America (Canada*)
	
*limited coverage

Specifications may vary from country to country.	

 

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A big Thank You to those who have donated already!

 


       
       
       
       

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