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3.10 - Engine Removal ( )

It seems that the workshop manuals suggest engine removal is the first step in every process from replacing the clutch to fixing a scratch in the paintwork. Sadly the manuals are usually correct. There are two ways to remove the engine, out through the top, or down through the bottom. I recommend the second, both for reasons of safety (lots of mass swinging from a chain), and a decreased likelihood of destroying your paint with a rogue tail shaft (been there, done that, fortunately it was a parts car).
Disconnect the ancillary equipment (don't forget the heater hoses, grounding straps, speedo cables and other transmission-related wires), drain and remove the radiator. Remove the front suspension as described above, connect an engine hoist to the lifting strap (or fabricate one from a stout piece of steel angle stock), and take up some load on the hoist. Place a floor jack at the tail shaft of the transmission, and disconnect the engine and transmission mounts (including the stabilizer link at the back of the block), and the drive (propeller) shaft. Lower the engine-transmission combination down onto a conveniently located sheet of cardboard. With a friend pulling on the cardboard, gently lay the engine on its side. Disconnect the hoist and pull the engine out from under the car.


3.10.1 - Timing Cover Removal with the Engine In ( Saltwick/Eck,  November 23, 2004 )


Paul Saltwick wrote on Nov.23, 2004

If you look at the manual you will find ''remove engine'' in the
first paragraph of almost every chapter. Jagaur was clearly in the
business of selling cars, not making things easy for us.

You can remove the timing cover with the sump (and head) in place,
it is just a tricky job, and not the proper procedure, especially
if your goal is stopping leaks. The damper must come of, you can
use an impact wrench to remove the bolt, but not to replace it.
The bolt is torqued to over 100 ft lbs and can put up a good
fight. You usually need a puller for the damper because of the
split cone arrangement, you can make on using the pulley bolts and
a piece of steel. The front seal is shrouded and cannot be removed
without removing the cover or the sump first. To remove the cover
without removing the sump, you need to pull off the inner seal
track, a large bushing on the crankshaft that makes the seal
surface. This requires every tool in the box and some unusual
sounding swear words. With the seal track out, there is just
enough room to pull up the seal to clear the sump.

Unfortunately, for whatever reason, you have chosen a particularly
difficult task. If your goal is to seal up a leak, pull the sump
and do it the right way, or you will be disappointed. I would
never remove the timing cover without replacing the timing chains
and front seal and seal track, you don't want to be doing this
again anytime soon. You may want to read up on the front seal
choices and the oil slinger dilemma before choosing.

Mike Eck writes on Nov 23,2004:

The bottom line is, you can't remove the timing cover without dropping the
pan. Not only are those studs sticking down through the pan but the front
crankshaft seal is set in a groove in both the timing cover and the pan. To
clear the seal the pan needs to be dropped at least an inch, and you can't
do that with the front suspension in place. You'll also need to remove the
damper for the same reason.

With the radiator out, removing the damper is almost trivial. Remove the
keeper and unscrew the big bolt a couple of turns. Wedge a couple of
screwdrivers between the damper and the edge of the pan and give the bolt a
sharp whack with a large (3 lb.) hammer. The damper should pop loose, but
be restrained by the bolt.

Dropping the suspension isn't such a big deal either. I could have mine
completely off in 15 minutes, but you could probably get away with just
removing the 4 bolts that hold the front mounts and jacking the body up
until the front of the suspension drops an inch or so.

If you are capable of removing the head you should be easily capable of
handling this.



 

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